澳门皇冠体育

澳门皇冠体育

字号+ 作者:mckay 来源:新型车 2020-06-01 04:32:37 收藏成功 收藏本文

送彩金💰AG88.SHOP💰澳门皇冠体育In a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600Amazon 'Forest Guardia/n&#】039】; shot in /the head by illegal loggers fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsC】o【uld seaweed be th【e fuel of the/ future/?"By\ d/oing good, good came【 back t】o me"/;A fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewThi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】l

360 \Video: Putting\ marine\ /reso【ur/ces on the ma\pWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】steIs f】ast/ fashion slowing down?

Bio/economy matter/\sIn this episod【/e, F【u/t/uris vis】its a /bioproduct mill i】n 】Finland where scientists, manage】rs, and inv\estors trying to p/roduce sustainable produ/cts using les/s \water and 】less energy.In the last】 f】e【w 【years, the European Un\ion has invested almos\t 4 billion eu】ros in re】search /a\imed at developing】 the】 economy in su/stai【nabl】e wa/ys.The B\ioecono【my sector a/lready employs 18 mil/lion p/e/ople with an\ annual turnover of around 2 trillion euros.Tha\t's】 /a hug/e/【/ economic pot/en】tial for\ agricul\ture, forestry, fisheries, food\, and bio-energy, that rely on a myriad of bio-base\d p【roducts cu/rren/tl\y being de/v\elop】【ed and hitting the markets around the whole continent.The \pot/ential of //pulpThe &A\uml;änek/osk】i bioprodu\c/t mil】l i】n Finland】 believes that【 it is /possible to【 transform】 up to 6.5 million cubi\c meters of pulpwood\, eve【ry yea\r, without using【 a sing/le drop\ 【of /fossil fuels.240 trucks and 70 full/y【 loaded train-w【ago\ns】 feed the mill every day with birch, spru\ce, and pine./Th\/e wo\od i【s 【used to prod【uce 【pulp, which has an annual\ p/】r】\oduct/ion\ of around 1.3 million tons.And yet, no fossil 【f】uels are \used /in t\he /whol】e pro\ces【s. 】Its managers say the mil/l i\s /completely self-suffi】cient."We are producing two and a half t/\imes more energy】 than we /are using ou\/r】s/el\ves," says Camilla Wikstr/【öm//, the 】senior/ \vi【ce-president\ /o【f Metsä\ Fibre."We /have sludge, an\d from\ the sludge【\, we/ ar\e making biogas. And then 】we have the bark, f\/\rom which we/ a【re m】aking\ product-gas and also the bark is sold out for en/ergy use outside\ the mill."【\The whole system is based on 】the idea of trying to prod】uce sus【tain【able products using less wa】ter and 】/less en/ergy. And co/ming up with ideas of ho】w】】 to use pulpwo/od i】n products other than the \usual paper an\d cardboard:"We have the ongoing pr【oject of making te】xtil/es fr【om the pulp. And also /the p\oss\ibility to 】make composites to replace 】plastics," adds Ca/milla Wi/kström.In la【boratories at the m\il\l, th【e inner prope\rties of raw materials are closely monit【\ore】d. Researchers ar【e driving t/】he development\ of sustainable thr\ee-lay/er cardboards aim\ed at i/n】/novative packagi/\ng."We are/ d】eveloping our /hig】h】\-yie【ld p】ulp】s and we/ are optimizing th】e three-layer st\r【u】ctu\re and\ then we need to know t【he information of the surface layers and then the b/ulky midd/le layer," sa/ys Terhi Saar【i, C/hemist \& director of the techno【logy 【c】enter, Metsä Bo\ard. "And (the aim is) to \make enough stre\ngth and stiffne/ss for our products".The mill required an initial inve/stment\ of 1.2 bill】ion 【euros and 【managers hope tha\t innov/at/ive green products made o\ut】 of wood will 】hel】p【 pa/y o【ff that huge inves\tment."Most/ o【f the new p【roducts/ \developed over 】the last 50 years or so w【er\e based o【n oil, they are \petroch\emical product【s," says Iklas von/】/ Weymarn, CEO of M\etsä Spri/ng."But now the situation /in terms of the business envir/o/nment, including climate】/ chan/ge an/d so o\n, is chang/ing, and【 it opens up new possibiliti】es to produce these prod【ucts fr\om wood."\Bi【【odegradable bagsAnot/】her key step in reducing 】our dependency on fos\sil fuels is/ our/ capacity t/o produce mor【e and better biodegradabl/【e,【 co【mpostabl【e biopla\stics.Resear/chers 【in Novamont \in\ northern Italy are currently developing 】and te\sting】 experimental\/ technologies to create biop】la/st】ic【s 【\fr\om ingred【ients 】suc【h as corn starch【, cellulose and vegetable oi\ls as raw materials.The /manufacturing ch\a\in \is comple\x and includes \mechanical processes 【like extrusion 【and b】lowi【ng, wh】ich trans\forms th/e natural materials\ into biopla】stic 】fi//lms,【 that can late【r be used/ to produce】 /\b】iogradable shop【【ping bag【s a/nd other biod】egrada【ble and com【postable products su【ch a\s 【plat【es, gla【sses and cutlery:The process of composti【n\/g\ or biodegrading】 these plastics into something more element】al, 】like organic carbon,\ or simply 】compo】st, takes \a long ti\me and the right c/ondi\tions.\Ale【s\【sandro【 D】&a】cute;elic【io【, an industrial chem【ist a【t No【【vamont sa/ys i/t's an u】ndergro】und process: "molecules of these 【b/ioplastics become, little by little, simpler, thanks to the a/ct\ion of microorgan\isms."T【he need for mech/anical tests is】】【 als/o importa】nt as bio】plast\ic 】must off/e/r 】th【e same str//ength \a】nd re【si】lience as ord\inary pet/ro/ch【emical plastics./ But ther\e is e\ven m】\ore to it:"Bey】ond /these m【echanical t/ests, w\e can al\/so ma】ke here qualitat/ive tests," says A】le【ssandro D´e【licio.【"We】 can/, for i\nst【ance\, measure the friction rate, or all p【roper\tie\s linked t/o the permeab【ility of the biomateria/ls,【 or /i【ts optical /properties"】These/ tests are part of】 a \Europe/a【n research projec【t ai/med at rethink【ing】 the whole plastic v】alue chai\/n, in an effort to create new business model/s and to better pr/otect the en】vironment./Researc】hers meet regu/larly to\ brainstorm new /innovation/s and 【eco-de/signs using bioplastics."We don´t simply want to c\hange one】 product for ano/ther," s/ays Luigi Ca\pizz\i, head】 】of research & developmen【t at Nov/amont."This is【 not our aim. We【 want to/ develop a syst\em that can mak【e /better use of the reso【urces of the planet; cons/uming【 less of thes/e re/sources, and redistributin/】【g them in a fairer, more】 efficien【t way."Educating the consumerEurop【e pr/oduces\ ar\ound 25 m】i【llion t//ons/ of pl】astic\ waste eve【ry year. On】ly a third is re】cycled, 【the rest/ is either in】carcerated or ends up in landfills,【 s\o u/rgent so//lutions are /\】\indeed nee】ded.Action on plastics was identifie/d by the European Commission in January 2018 as a priority /in the C【ircular Economy Action Plan, to help/ Europe】an/ businesses /and consumer\s to 【use r\【esou\rces i【【n a more sust/aina【ble way\.Sap/onia/, a/ leading de\terg\ent and personal hygiene pro【ducts ma\nu/fact】ure/r in Croatia is already【 us】【ing /b/iopla【stics\】 on the interior of their deterg\en/t pa\ckaging/."We \star/ted usi【ng a certai【n ty\pe of 【bioplas【\tic produ/ct【 /】/and then simply teac】\/h our consumers tha】t/ its\ better for them an\d for the en\viro【nment," says Andrea Bozi】】\c, h\ead of education】 and information center at【 Saponi/a."So ov【e\r【 time//, we noticed【 】that they a\ccepted these types of plas\tics and product pa【ck/ag】ing, so we will simply broad\en it \to our ot【her pro\du/cts."Resea/rchers hope their work will add /to a European 】tar\get of s】ome 10/ mill/ion to\ns of recyc/【led plastic】s being\ t【【】ransformed i\nto n/ew products by 2025.A【lo/ng with research and innovation, sc\ientists/ sa\y, education will play a c】ru/】cial ro/le in me\eting tha/t objective."There are cou】n】tries\】 in Northern Europe whose plastic waste management system i\s ve\ry well im】plemented an【d deve】loped】," says Montserrat Lan/ero, an indus【trial engineer an【//d CIR】/C-PA】CK project manager."Bu\t in other countri【es, th/is management of p】lastic wa【st【e does not ev【en exis【t. A/nd【 many】 cit/izen/s don't know what the implications of this bad manageme】nt are when it 【comes】 to \】how plastics end up in t/\【he o\ceans or ent】\er o】ur f\ood chain【.""So one of ou】r main challenges i【s to understand what are th】e needs\ of each Euro\pean cou\ntr/y to be a\ble to find /as】 many ada】pte\d solutions as we \can".To und】erstand thos【e needs, researc【hers hav】e turned t】o the concept o【f "citizen scien/【ce", /inv【olving consumers associations, to understand what the social and market expe【ctations are when i/t /comes to \reinforcing th】e ci】r】cular economy in the plas】tic sector."We need to e】m/power the citizen. Beca】use often t/hey /don'】t realize t\h】at their shopping【\ decis/i/o】\n is very important /in 】movin/g the market toward】s more \sustainabl】e trend【s," says Bel&eac\/ute;n Ramos, project officer for the envi】ro/\nment【 a】/t the Spani\sh Organi\sation of Consumers and Users Consu【mers - O【CU."B/ut we\ also need to em【po/wer th】e market so it can give\ a】 wider array of c\hoices to the consumer."On【e European research pr】ojec/t studyi【ng /t【h】e possibilities/ of\ crea/ting new b【ioproducts /which we\re previou【sly mad/\e with \chemic/als or oil-based /prod/ucts is the Exil】va biorefinery in N【orway./Scientists there ar【e【 tr】ying to transfor【m trees into products for at s【ectors as diverse as the automotive industry, the adh\esive ind\us【try,/ and even cosmetics.Every year 1 millio】n cubic】 meters of Norw【egia\n spruce \are trans】formed into cel/lulose, l【ignin, bioeth【anols and ce【llulo/se【 fibers.T\hese cellulose fibers/ can be turned/ into 【bioproducts through a proc【ess known a/s 【"fibrillat/ion"."The properties that som\e of the custom】/ers are looking f】or are th\e controlled vis/cosity it off/ers, so for instance /whe【n you are paintin【\g, yo】u avoid drippi/ng 【or sagging of the\ pain\t when you are applying it to t/he wal】l," says Jarle Wikeby, a ch/emical e\ngineer at【 Ex/il\va."Or you can c【ontrol the har/de】\ning 【process within adhesives. And y\ou can also have a g【ood effe】ct by adding the/ product i【nt/o c\osmetics, or \antiwrinkle/ creams】 for instanc/e."Laborato\ry research \helps improve th【e properties of th】e product and en\hance its array of industrial applications.Sc/ientists at Borregaar\d /biorefinery wo\rk to develop hi】gh efficiency and/ robust 】products for harsh environments."We are looking at particle size or specific aggregate sizes,\" 】say【s\ K\ristin 【Weel Su\ndby\, a chemist 】at Borregaard."As yo/】u \might kno\w, we also have\ two different qual/ities, one is more fibri/llated that the other. \And we 】are also starting to】 look at more film properties. With the product, you can ma【ke films/ tha/t have very goo/d\ barrier propertie【/s, oxygen barrier\s, that give strength to the /products."The pro【duct i\s one o\f】 the 700 bas】】ed on n/atural ra/w materials】 /being develope【d the\re, which【 managers 】s/ay is a trend that should grow/ in the c\omi【ng\ years:"Our product is typic\/ally a little help【er. /So you\ on】ly need a \litt\le【 new formulation to change completely a product f\rom oil-based to water-based," says Pal Rombe】rg,/ vice-pre【sident】 of B】orregaard."So 【i/t is not really a cost issue here. 】Consumer a\wareness a\nd general public aw】areness crea\te a drive】 fo\r more sustainability and /greener product\s. And this r\e】ally motiv/ates companies 】out there【 to go d【own【 tha\】t 】road a【nd really/ sp【end on resources fo【r devel】oping new,【 better products".Th】ese better products,【 rese【archers sa】y,/ should keep【 s\tea】dil\y coming to\ the ma】rkets, as t】he \European Uni/on is planning to invest a】nother 10 billion eu】r【os in\ Bioeconomy research by 】2027.12 】 【 FUTURIS \LONG 1\ / 】】 \ 12 / \ \ 】 / / FU/【【TURIS LONG 1 / 】 \ 【 12 】 / \ /FUTURIS LONG 1 】 【 【 【 \】 \ 12 】 /】 【 / FUTURIS \L\ONG \ 【 【 12 【 / FUTURIS LON【G 1\ \ / 】 / / 【 \ 】 Share th/is ar】ticleCopy/pas\te the article video embed link\ bel\ow:CopyShar/eT/weetShare\se\ndShareTwee】tSharesendMoreH【ideShareS/endShareShareShareSendShar/eS\hareY】ou might also li】ke 【 / 】 Sar\dinian thistles play /key 】rol/e in bioplastics 】 【 【 / / Could bio-plastic 】\/be the answer to bot【tl\】e wo\es? 】 \ 【 【 More a【boutSust\ainable devel/opment【RecyclingEnvironm】ental】 protection 】 M/\ost viewed / / 【\ \ \ W【ha】】t influence on climate is the cor【onavirus lockdown really having? 【 /\ The ne\w AI【 system sa\feguar\ding\ prem\ature b\abies f/rom infecti】on / \ / \ Messenger RNA: th\e mol/ecule /th\at may tea\ch o\ur bod\ie【s to beat cancer/ \ 【 /\ / \ / 】 \Apple and Goo【gle sa/y t\he\y&\#039;ll w】ork together\ to tr\ace spread o\f coronavirus via smartphones 】 \ 】 【 How EU funding is changing】【 the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 \ // Brows【e today's tagsText si【zeAaA\aHaving cricket tacos or fried Man\churia/n scorpi/ons on the menu of your favourit【e organic and susta【in【able resta\/【urant ha/s a pr】etty good 】chan【ce in 】the futu【re.【 E【dible insects are on/ the/ r\i】se, t【hey are becomin】g more and more popular f【or nu【tri】tion】a】l/ reasons\ and f/or environmen/tal b/enefits./\According to a r】e/port of Global Market Insights,【 the global edible\ i【ns】ects market s/\ize is /expect】ed to grow f/r【om o/ve【r $】55 mi【llion in 27 to】 over 0 million by 2024.In 】the We【stern part of the】 wo】rld, the gastronomic argument is on the go wh】ile many】 hig】h-e】n】d r】estaurants joine】d it alr\eady, such as the multiple winner of the Wo】rld’s B【est Restaurant, Noma】 in Copenhagen, which h】ad become widel】y kno/wn for its efforts to make】】 in【sects as an acc】eptable food】 fo【r th\e futu\re. Another temple of hi【gh-en/d g】astronomy, S&atil】de;o Paulo&rsqu/o;s D.O.M., ranked the ninth best re/staurant in】 the】 】world】, made headlines a fe/w years ago by s】erving a r\aw/ Amazo\nian leaf-c/utter ant on a pi\\neapple cube.In an era in which】 concern o\ver the world'【s climate only c\ontinues to grow deep【er/, experts 】are re】g【ularly encouraging extreme and pe】rhaps even creative action. Hence advocates of/ edible in/sects ar\e singing the/ en/vironmental】 benefits of s\prinkli【ng your di】she【s 】【with crickets, grasshopp\ers and ant【s】.B】ugs p【ack a lot of protein and minerals but take 【far f\/ewer reso】urces /to produce than animal meat/.Click on the vi\deo above 】to learn more abou\t 】the\ high-end ins】ect dishes 【serv/ed in New York City/.S】ha】r\e\ this 】\article / \ More from wellnessMore preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tags

This expo \is unit/ing designers wit【h【 thou【sands of responsibl【y \source\d materials 】Wa】t/ch: Iceland's meltin/g \Vatna/jökull Nat\ional Park fights for/ Wor】【ld\ Heritage Statu】s【Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tags

  澳门皇冠体育

Text sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from lifeHow can we b/alance urbanisatio】n with protec【/ting the en】vironment and qua/l\ity of life?

 

Life under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsSaving the Sey】che\ll/es: plas\t\i【c 【washes up \on sho】res/ hardly t【ouched b】y \m\ankindPush to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers

  澳门皇冠体育

Tex\【t size\AaAaIn a historic \m】ove for the/ /east A/frican nation, Ethio【p【ia 】has this】 week announced a tree-p/lan】ting/ initia【tive, vi】a/ UN Environment, to outd\o vir【t/ual】ly any/ ot\he【r country in the world. Based /initially at the Gu】le/le Botanical Garden in the capital of Ad/dis Ababa, volunte/ers \be\gan pla】nting 350 million tr\ees 】spanning r\ight across the country. In\ just /12 hours, the world record was broken, in an \ad】m/irable attempt to combat the effects of】 de\fo】restatio】n a/nd cli】【】mate change. By fu【】l/fill\/in【g\ the tree-plantin/g re】cord,/ th【e】 c】ountry is surpassing i/ts Green Legacy goal, 【conceived by Eth】io】】pian】 Pr/ime Minister/ A\】b】iy Ahmed, o/f pla\/nting 2\Founda/tion promot【es sustainable food 【product/i】【on million tr】ees\ in a day【 at over 1,】000 sites.The /l/ast country \to attempt【 su【c\h a feat was India, who have been reigning\ cha/mpi【on】s since 1 when they planted 49.3 million trees in\ just one【 day, invo【lving 800,000 vo】lunt【eers. Equally, back【 in/ /2018, China announced plans to 【plan\t forests c\overing an area rou【ghly the size of /Ireland and the UK, one of the least\ forested countries】 in Europe \(13% according t【o /Forest R【esearch), spent 】£.7 million to develop a new north】【ern forest 【】in 20【【18. Co\uld the trend o/】f countries competing /\to plant the mo/st saplings be catching on?】E/thiopia's Prime Min/ister Abiy A【hm/ed, A/ugus\t 2019ReutersThe United /Nations En【】vi】ronment】, al\o】\ng with ot\her international organisati【ons, all backe\d the initiati】ve, believing firmly in the /power of tree rest】oration\ in //helpi\n】g to a/bsorb carbon dioxid】e, a m/ajor propell】er\ of global heati\ng./What is Aff【ore【station and /why does it】 help the p】lanet?Tr\ee-planting is called 】afforestation, quite\ simply, the op】posite】 o【【f deforestation. Many studies, 】including o【ne conducted by A/】merica/n scientific journ【al PNAS in 2017\, hav\e document【【\ed /that restoring forest\s in】 their natural f】or\ms is】 \one of, if not the s【in】gle mos】t, efficient an【swer to】 improving global wa\rming.Acco】rdin/g to the UN, f】orest \coverage in Ethiopia has d/eclined drastically since the/ start of the century, reaching a \l】ow of just 4% i】n the early\ 2000s【, /as opposed to 35% 【100 years ago. So, ac/tion had to be take】n to improve 】the /leve\l \of 【e/missions in the atmosph【ere, i/n the】 form of this ambitious】 task.Wh【at h\appen\s is, /trees and vege\tatio\n absorb t\he excess carbon dioxid】e \】we emi\t due \to human a\ctiv【ity with fossil fuel】s,\ meani】n\】g tha\t th\e CO2 c\an be st【ored, and the heat absorbed. In this way, the he\ating of t【he planet【 is lessened and, in turn, the tr【ees he/lp to preserve /the ec【osystems be/neath th/em/【\ and ensure si/gnificant e】nvironme】nta【l benefits/ as a who\le. F/or \instance, en\c/ou\raging rainfall, pr\oviding clean water, r】edu【ci/ng air pol【lution,】 and impr/ov】ing the livelihoods for local peopl\e in s/urr】ounding areas.Nature\ Va【lley\, AfricaJuliette B【iao Koudenoukpo,\ Dir【ector of UN\ Environment&rsq】uo;s Africa Office explain/【s in an official statemen/t:&\ldquo;Afforestation is t\he most ef\fective climate cha】nge 】solution to date a\nd with the ne/w record set by Ethiopia, other African na】\tio】ns should move with speed and chal\lenge the status quo.&【rdquo;“Africa has what 【it take/s to spearhead thi\s glo【bal pu/sh and as the most affected and v【ulnerable c\ontinent, \clim【ate cha/nge miti/gation must 】be \the\ \t/opmost pr/io】rity in the comi【ng da】ys. We at【 UN Environment are taking the lead\ in helping to build capacity 【for\ nations and people to 】ap【ply/ /th\emselves to afforestation and climate chang/\e mitigation strategies.”353,633,6/60 Tree Seedlings Pl】an/ted in 【12 Hours. This【 is/【 i/n /【#Ethiop\iansRegional Shares of T】rees Pla\nted toda\y.#P】MOEthiopi/a#Green】LegacyEthiopiapic.twitter.co】m/2BkTD/tYedC&mdas//h; D【r.-Ing.【 Geta\hun Mekuria (@DrGetahun) July 29, 2019Ultimate\ly, t/he goa\l is f\or 4 b\illion【】 ind】igenous trees to be planted /acr/o/\ss the dr/o】ught-prone nation, rep\orts the BBC, w/hich will make 【an en\ormous difference to t【he】 stability of the【 climate.Share this article More from pla】cesT\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from life

 

Thi/s regenerative fabric no\】uri【shes soi】lTo【r\re Guaceto, a】n eight-kilometre long stretch of coastli【ne north-west of Brindisi, used to be【 know/n as a centre for poor fishing practic\es, black market smuggling and /a drop-off point 【for illegal immi\gration.Now it's famous around t【he world for the【 way 】it's t【ransf/ormed itsel】f.The coast i【s n】ow a\ p\rotected mar【ine 【re\serve and s【trict】 rules are in /place so that /tourism\ and fishin/g don’t】 har】m the nat\ural env\ironment.The【 European Uni】on】 h\as comm\itted to se\t aside 10 per ce/nt o【f【 all i】ts waters as 】marine protecte【d\ ar\eas by 2020. This targ/et was met two y】ears before the d//eadline. Today, 62】5,000 squa【re kilometre/s of marine and coastal waters in Europe are protected, which 【is 【expected to bring【 m/ore than 3 billion euros of annual benefits.In/ 2/001, Torre Guaceto imposed a 【/five-yea/r ban 【on f/ishi】ng to rebui【\ld the ca/\tastrophic\all【y declining s/tocks. To】day, a fe\w loc【als/ are permitted to fish fo\r j】ust one day a wee/k, usin】\g n】ets that c】an’t catch】 small fish.Fisherma【n Cosimo De Bi\asi to【ld 】Ocean/: 】【“Be/\f】】ore the r/eserve w【as\ /establish/ed, this 】whole area was rife 【with dyna】mite fish/i】ng/, cigaret【\te【 smuggling and illegal immigr】a/nts. Today, thanks to /the p【r\otected area, all we can see here is th】e pristine sea.”The protecte【d area is man\aged by【 a consortium \that represents【 local communities and/ the/ World Wide Fu【nd for Natur】e, th】e// WWF.It enf/orces the rul】es that have【 been \agreed with \the fish\ermen. Th【at \includes monitoring the\/ir catches to ma\k【e su/re that the pr】otection e】ffor\【ts are 【effective.And the fishermen are happy with【 the new controls on what t/\hey catch.“When we ca\t】ch a big fish an\d brin/g i\t ashore, we can sell【 it n【ot for f/\ive eur/o/】s, but for】 /20 【to 25 euros,&r】【dquo; De Biasi said.Francesco \de Franco, head of t【he envir\onmental an【d technical unit at the Torre Guaceto con\sortium, said fish stocks h\a】ve recovered in the marine reser\ve.&l】dquo;O【utside the protect\ed area, the levels of\ fish /rem\ain basically the same】 as in the past. And in\s】ide this are\a, the \fis/h /s】tocks have rough【ly doubled,\" h】e \said.Wider be/nefitsAnd /it’s no】t just the sea that&rsquo\;s【 being protected. The dunes and we【t【lands along t】he/ coas\tline are a precious stop-off point for migratory bi/rds】 and a perman【【ent 】home to m/any l/ocal /spec】【ies.\The Torre /Guaceto area, named after its 】centuries-ol\d watchtowe】r, is patrolled day \】and ni】ght by the coast guard and 】the police. They】 【say most danger toda【y comes【【 from careless visito【rs w\ho might pick plants or damage coral\ near the shor\e.To/urists\ who re/spect the environment are welcome).In the p【ast, these sandy beaches were 【f\ull of litter and overcrowded. 】】Cleaning up the area, 】introdu\c】ing 】guided t/our\s and【 l\imiting car a】ccess\ made a 】big diff【erence: now, 【in peak】 season,/ Torre Guaceto /gets】 visited /by 5000-6000/ tourists a day.Mimmo Miccoli fro】m Bres/cia has been visiting for years.&ldq\uo;This /place used to be a m】ess, wi】th/\ cars parked every/where,"\ /he told Oce】an. "Now, all the cars have to /be l/eft in the car /pa【r【【k at th\e\ top of t\he roa\d /—【 /】so the pl】ace is 【no/w much 【nice/r, cl/eaner\.”The \f\low of tourist\s 【also bene【fi【ts businesses that have embraced the】 t\rend for sust/ainability.Ma】ria\ Lanz【il/otti 【runs a restaur/ant in nearby Car/ovigno which s/pe\cial【【ises in lo【ca【l orga/nic cu\isin】e.&l【dquo;We always/ have fresh, good, healthy fish from the se【a," /she said. "And ou】r lan】d produces lo/ca/l toma/toes and so on, so it is very import【ant \for me and for all of us restaurateurs /to have this natural \【res【erve — it’s our marvel!&rdquo/;Backed by European f\unds, o/ne-thi【rd of 】local farms have n\o/w conve\【rted to【 organic productio/n, boos】ti【ng 【the【ir sales by associati/ng their brand【s with the n】ow fam\ous Torr】e Guaceto pr\otected【 area.E】stablished to preserve the environment, this marine protected ar【/ea became an attractive/ ec\o-】tourism destinat】ion with a/ sus/tainabl】e econ\omy &mdas\h; a success story th】a】t\ expert/s say should serv/e an example to othe】r places 】like Torre Gua/ceto/.Ni】co】lò Carnimeo, 【vice-presid【ent of the Torr】e Guaceto mana【gement consortium, \s/ai】d:【 “I \would\ say【 t】hat protecting 10 per cent of 【Eur【ope’s waters is st\ill not eno【ugh — we sho\uld go further, keepi】ng in mind the s/o-called /circ】ul】ar eco】nomy, l\ike wh\at we ha【ve he\re. Thi/s does work, and I would say thi】s is how i【【t should be d】one in other mar【ine protecte】【d areas 】too.&r【dquo;1212121212【/1212Sha/re thi】s articleCopy/p】ast/e the article video embed link】 below【【:CopyS【ha】re\TweetSh\ar【esen/dShar/eTweetS\haresendMoreHid/eShareSendShareShareShareSendSha【reShareYo/u might al【so lik\e 】 / \ Sea ch/an/ge: how 】one 】small】 stretch of coastline in Italy tr】ansfo】rmed itself 】 /【 More aboutEnviro【nm】ental protec【【tionFauna and FloraFisherySea 【 \ \ Most /】v【iewed 【\ \ 】 What in/fluence/ on c【li【mate】】 【is \th\e coronavir】\us】 lockdo\wn r【eally having? 【 / / 【 \ 【【 】 The new AI system sa】feguarding premature ba】bies \from infectio】n 】 \ Messen】ger R】】NA: the molecule that may te【ac/h our bodies to beat cancer / 】 Apple and 】【G\oogle say they'll work together to tra/】c\e spr【ead of c/oronavirus via【 smartphones 【 / / / How】 EU fun\d【ing is【 changing/ t】he face o\f Latv/ian innovation/】 / \ 【 / 【 Brow【se today'/s tagsTake/ a look at Prince Har\ry's re】ma/rkable message on Earth】 Day

  澳门皇冠体育

A/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tags】While many citizens /across E/urope【 were celebrating Easter Monday,】 April /22 also marked】 Earth Da\y.【What 【is Earth Day?】Observed on 【the same date ev\ery 】ye】ar】,】 va【riou\s events are hel/d across the 【globe on Earth Day to d\emo【nstrate support for env】ironmental pr【otection.T\/he Ear】th Da\y Network now coordinates efforts【, worki【ng y/ear【-ro/und to 【solv/e clima【te chang/e, end plastic poll\ution, protect\ e\ndangered species, and enc【oura【】g】e the environment/al movement.Wh【en 】d【i【d】 it】 sta【rt?Peace activist John【 McConnell 【f\irst prop【o】se【d the idea of Earth Day /in 1969 at a 】UNESCO Con\ference in San F】rancisco.His goal was to //honour the Earth a】nd 】the co】nc【ept of peac【e on one day\ in the US, /which was【 first cele】brated on March 21, 19/70\ — 】t【he first day of spri/ng i/n the n【orthern he】/misphere.US Senator Gay】lo\rd Nels/on founded Ea【rth】 【Day one mont】h later on Apr【il 22/,\【 /1970, /after witnessi【】ng the rav/ages of the 1/969 mass】ive oil spill in San/ta Barbara, California.While it was【 o\riginally/ an】 Americ/an initiative, 】the concept was taken inter/n\ational in /1990,【 with events organized in 141 /co\untries.What events are h【/ap/pe【ning in Eu/ro【pe?Institu\tions 【across Eu】rope m/arked Ea【rth Day with va【rious ini【tia】】【\t\ives in 19\.The \Internat【iona】l Sc】hool of G】\en/eva in S【witzerland w/as set to /host a “green sale” and an organic food sale to raise money to/ plant trees on\ the school/ g】rounds.I\n Chisinau, Mol【/dova, the Gutta-Club — an or】ganisa】t【ion working mai/nly on educ\ation, energy, cli【mate and sust】ainable deve\lop【me【nt — host【ed a r【ange of Ear\th Da/y events including cle\an-u\p/ e【fforts in 30 villag【【es,】 a tree plant】【ing movement,【】 and the building of nesting boxe【s fo】r bir【ds.EC/O-】UNE\SCO in Dublin o\/rganised its annual/ ECO-Explorer C/amp for kids\ where child】ren 】aged 5-12 could 】explore the local urb【an 【ecology, take weather measurements, inves/tigate wildlife and d\iscover the city's g【reen spaces.W/【ha\t\ can I do?The U/nited Nat】ions published "T【he Lazy Person&r\sq】uo;s Gui】de/ to Saving\ the World", in which it lists actions people can take in line with \i【ts Sustainable Deve】】lopment Goals.The o【rganisation categorised the s\uggestions f【\rom 【lev【el 1 to le/vel 4, depending on whet】her the tasks were \at home, at work/ or i【n so】meone's local area.Here are s/ome\ suggest/ions f【r】om al\l four \levels:Save el\ectricity b【y pl\u【gging appl/iances into a power strip and turn】ing them off c/o】mpl】etely wh【en not in【 us\e, including your co【mputer.Stop 【pa】per \bank statem\ents and pay your bill/s onlin\e 】or via mobi】le【.Buy mini】mally packaged go\ods.】G/et a 】r\ug &mdash】; carpets 】and【 rugs keep your house 】warm and your the/r】m/ostat l【ow.Ta】ke short showers. B】\athtubs re/quire 【gallons more water than a 5-10 minute \shower.Com【posting\ food s【craps /can reduce climate/ impact 】while\ a/\lso recycling nutrients.【Let your hair and clothe/s d\ry natur】a/lly inste\ad of running a machine. If you do wa】sh your clothes, make sure t\he load is full.Eat l\ess meat, poultry, and fish. More re】sources are u\sed to pr】ovide meat than plants.Plan meals &mda/sh; use /sho\p/ping lists and av/oid imp/ulse\ buys. D【on&rsquo】;t succumb to marketin\g tricks\ th/at lead 【you t/o buy m\ore food t【h\an you need, p【art【icularly for perishable item【/s】.Bike【,\ wa\lk or take public t【ransport.】 Save the car tr】ips for when// you&rsq】uo;ve got a big group.Use a refillable water bottle an【d\/ /\【coffee cup.Share/ th】is articl\eShareTwee【\tSh】ares\endSh\are/Twee/\tSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShareSh【areSendShareSha【reYo】u might also li【ke 【 \ / / Ba【lance /'by disas【ter or design】9;: Why should we/ be worried by Earth Overshoot Day? 【| Euronews Answe【rs \ 】 \ 【 E/U&】#039;s youngest commission【e【】r on how to turn climate c【risis around 】 /】 / 【/ '【;Inc】redible win for nature': Plans\ \【to drill in G】reat Australian Bight abandon\ed \ More aboutEnvir】onm/ent】Environmental protectionEurope \ 】 Bro【wse today'\;s t/\ags

 

Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000How smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunities twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeEthiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one dayOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tags

  澳门皇冠体育

\Clima\te change i/s\ makin【g Arctic waters more access】ib/le to/ vessels, 】\raising the c\on/troversial prospe【c】t of more ind/ustrial-\scale fishing/. On the lates/t episode of】 \Ocean, Euronews】 looks at what'\s being done】 to prev/ent\ /the】】 threat to \the 【A】rctic e】cosystem.Greenland i】s warming\. Among/ other thi【ngs,\ this【 means long\er f】ish【ing seasons. Be/tween the ic///ebergs o/f Iluliss】at, it&rsq【uo;s 】a gold ru/sh. Fish\ing boat】s equipped with【 mo【dern machinery pull up hundreds of ki/los of catc【h every d/ay.Ilulissat fisherman Marti】n J&os【las/h;rgense\n is worried:&ld【quo;There】\’s too much fishing goi【ng on around here】. It’/s so p】rofitable\ now that al【【l the】 b/ig 】】fish h【ave been taken out; we’re catching smaller fi/sh now”.Sleds, dogs and boatsTo be\ closer to buyer/s, fisherm\en are moving from 【coastal villag/es to ci\ti【es. 【The【 population of Oqaatsut, an \Inuit s\/ettlement on Greenland’s west】 c/oast, ha/s f】al/len to less th/an 30 people. Sle】d d\ogs, tra【ditionall【y us】ed for【 ice fishing and 】huntin/g, have been d【ecimated i/n man/y commu/nities, as th【e 【w\ar】/mi\ng climate makes bo【at/s mo【re usefu【l than dogs.&rdquo/;The sledding 【used】 to start in【 October," say/s/ Oqaatsut fish【erma/n Steen Gabr/ielsen, "but now that there’s not eno【ugh ice, we ca【n just use bo\ats all year round.&r\dquo;Arctic Se\a Ice Reaches 2019 Minimum Extent\C\hanging ecosystemAs the seas \get war/mer, new species of fish are finding their way to Greenland&】rsquo;【s c【oa/sts —【 【the/se include mackerel, herring, At/lantic \bluefi】n/ tuna and cod. But not every\one is ha/ppy. \The fishermen say t【heir most profitable catch — halibut — /is getting harder to find during the warmer pa/rt of th【e year.“Halibut li\kes cold water," explains Niels Gundel/, a /fisher\m【an 】in Ilulissa/t.【 "As summers /b】ecome warmer and longer 【it moves away, to stay wher【e【 it&rsq】uo;】/s【 c【\ool.”Immin\ent/ dan【】gerI/n the fut\ure, retreating sea i】ce an【d /changes in/ fish stocks could bring commerc/ial fish】ing fleet【s into th】e unprotected international wate】rs a】/round t】\he North Pole.Scien/t\ist】s a\【re sounding t】he alarm: unregul\ated fishing could destr】oy the poorly studied e】cosystem of/ the Centra/l Ar【】ctic Ocean】, where fish can b】e sparse and essent】ial to the s/urvival of】/ other【 animals.In a bid t\o stave off t】his imminent thr\e【at/, the European Union br【ought all\ main parties togeth/er in Ilulissat to agree on】 a c/】omme】rcial fishing】\ ban 】in the Arc/tic hi\gh seas\ for at least 16 ye/ars.【T【his land/mark internati】onal a】g】reement was s/【igned by the EU, C/anada, C\hi\na, Denmark (inclu/ding Greenl】and and【 the Fa】roe Island/s), Iceland, 】J【】apan, the /Republi】】c of Kor\ea, Norway, Russia and the U\nited States. Together, thes\e 【pa\rties represent some 75% of gl【obal GDP.Arctic cat\ch 2017Under this legally bindi【ng agreement, /the 】C/entral Arctic area - roughly the size \of the Medit【er/】ranean Sea - will remain off-limits for 【f【ishi【n\g fle【ets, at【 leas】t unti/l scientists con】firm\ that fishing i】n the r\egi】on can be done su【stai】nably.Preca/utionary ap【proachAt the Arctic \University of Norway in \Troms/ø, Professor To\re Henrikse/n he\ads the】】 Norweg\ian Centre for the Law of the/ Sea\.&l/dquo;T\his agree\ment/ is reflect\ing the precauti/o】nary a】pproach, that whe/n you// ha【ve little or very\ inadequate /\inform\/ation you should act\ cautiously \and only reg【ulate, and adapt the regu/lation, according to 【the in【formation/ you have," Professor Hen\rikse】n explains. "P】reviously, 【you started fishing, /and then you regu】late it. And th】en at 【that stage,】 it could b\e too late.”/Map\ping the Arctic se/asThe【 futu】re of the】 ban 【will depend on th\e find\ings o/f the scien/tific c/onsortium le【d by pro】fessor Pauline /Sn】\oeijs Leij/onmalm. Sh】e heads a\ t】eam of European researchers on the MOSAiC expediti】【on — a year-long silent ice drift close to the North \Pole.Onboard th/e Polar\stern icebreaker“Normall【y, wh\en】 【the ic/ebreak】er mov【es through 】the\ \ice, you w/ill/ not get good acoustic data,/ because th】ere/’s too much sound fro/m t【he i/cebreaker. No/w we&rsquo【;\ll have a whole year \】o\/f acoustics, and it\ 【is just a d\ream!&/rdquo;As w】【ell【 as using sona/r, the /\EU-suppo//rted r\esearchers will rec】ord vid/eos with a deep-water【 camera, take environm】ental DNA sam【ples at various depths, a/nd for the f【irst time catch some Central Arctic fish.】MOSAiC Exp/edition/'s d\eep-water/ re/search camera“We will\ be able to a/nalyse its stoma\ch, 】its/ stable isotopes, i/t【】】【s fatty ac\i【ds," Profe】ssor Leijonmalm says. "It will tell us 】about the 】he】alth【 of the fish, and where/ it has com\e/ from because \fish mi\grate — so we /w【ill have a 】lot of info】rmat【ion, just by having/ a fish in our hands.”The disco【veries of thi\s \and fu\t】ure】 expe【ditions will deter\mine wheth【er fi【sh】ing /\in the Central Arctic Oce\an /can be done sustainably &mda】sh; or whether \these h/igh se】as should remain untouche\d for the dec【ades to come.】To wat】ch th【e f【ull epi\sode of /Ocean, click on 【the media pla/yer above121212121212121212Share this/ articleCop】y/paste the article 】【video embe【d li\nk below】:CopyShareTweetSharesen/dShareTweetSharesen【dMoreH/ideShareSendShare【ShareShareSendShare【ShareYou might als\o like \ \ 【 】/ 【 \ EU fish/ quota q\uarrel\ - ministe/rs hail d\ea/l, NGOs slam overfishing 【 【 】 \ 【 \ 】 Watch: Thirty-】five years of Arctic thaw in\ tw/o minut/es / / \ 【 】 【 S】cientists have embarked fro】m\ /Norway on the longest-ever expedit/ion to the /Arctic 【 【 【 More ab/ou/tGlobal warming and cli】mate change【FisheryArcticEnv\iro】nment\al prote/ctionGreenland 【 /\【 【 Mo】st viewed 【 【 【 / \ 【 \ \ What infl\uenc】e o\n climate is/ the coronavirus 【lockdown \r【eal【【ly havi】ng? / 】 The new AI system safeg】【uar/d\【ing premature /babies fro/m infecti\o【n \ 】 【 】 \ 【 / Messenger RNA: the molecule that may/ teach our b【odies to beat cancer【】 \ 【 】\ 【 】 \ A】pple a】nd Google 】say they'll work toge【ther【 to】 trace spr】ead of coronavi/rus via smartphones \ // 】 How EU funding is chan【ging t【h\e face/ of 【L】【atvi/an in】novation\ 【 【 Browse tod【ay's\ tagsText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/es

 

  第一,澳门皇冠体育Push to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers

  第二,澳门凯时官网Could jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?

  第三,澳门皇冠体育Greta Thunberg\, \the 16-year-old cli【mate activ/is【t who h】as inspired stud\ent protes【ts \across the gl【/obe, has set off to the United States this week in an env【ironmentally\-friendl】y yacht.But her【\ two-week voyag\e a】cross t】he Atlantic will be 】no ple【asure c【ruise.She /will ins\tead】 be on a \high-tec\h racing/ yacht as she travels to UN clima【te summits next 【month 】】in New【 Y】ork and in Santiago, Chile, in December."Of course, it's going to】 be c【hallenging for everyone on the】 \boat/, probably that is what you have to expect】. "There are always goi\ng to be【 people who don't under\sta【nd /or don'【t【】 ac\cept the s/cience【.&ldqu】o;I w】ill just ignore 】them because,【 I mean, I'm only acting and communicating o】n the scie【nce, and 】if they don【't like that then, /I mea【【n, what have 】I g【ot to do a】bout that\?"Hig【/hlight/ing the urgency o】f cutting carbon \emissions, the y【oung Swe\de last month announc\ed she would no lon\】ger fly to envir】\onment】al conferences.Pierre Casiraghi, the /gra/n】【dso】n of 】Monaco's late P【rince Rain/ier III and Amer】ican act/ress Grace Ke】lly, helpe/【d her】 k【\e】\ep that pledge 】by o\ffering her pas【】sage】 on a racing ya】【cht.Sailing on the\ 60-foot (18-metre) Maliz/ia I【I, outfitted with solar pane】ls and underwater turbines to gener】ate elec】t\ricity】, Th/【unberg will make a zero-carbon tra【ns-】Atlanti】c /journey.But to call it】 a 'no-frills' pas】sag/e 【would be an understateme\nt.The sailboa\t i】s \built for high-speed, offs/hore racing, with weight kept to a】 minim】um.The o】nl】y alterations f【or the voyage are fit/ti【ng curt【ains in front of the\/ bunk a】nd ad【ding mattr】esses \f【or comfor/t.T】here is no \toilet or fixed【 shower, \a sm/】all gas cooke\r 】and the food will be freeze-dried.Share t【h\is article/Co】py/paste th】e articl/e v【ideo embed link \below:/CopyShareTweetSharesend/ShareT【\weetSharesendMo/reHideShare【Se】n】dS/hareShareSha】reSendShareS/hare/You might【 also lik/e Watch again: Greta Th【unberg joins clima\te prote】】st ou【t\side United /Na/tions HQ \ 【 / 【 / 【 Plans for Heathrow a【】ir【p【ort third runw【ay in/ doubt a\【fter \court ruling on【 c】limate c【hange】 】 【 】 Watch:\ Cli】mate change protesters bid to s【t】op in】coming 【PM Boris Johns【on \ 】 【 More aboutGlobal warming and climate changeEnvironmental protect/ionAir \pollutionHo\t TopicLea【/rn more about】/ Globa/l war【ming a】nd c【limate ch\ange\ Hot】 TopicLearn more a/bout Global\/ warming and 】climat】e chang\e \ / 】 Bro/\wse\ today's ta\gs

  第四,水果老虎机Text 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places

澳门皇冠体育


澳门皇冠体育遵循行业规范,转载的稿件均会明确标注来源;本文仅代表作者个人观点,与澳门皇冠体育无关。对本文以及其中全部或者部分内容、文字的真实性、完整性、及时性本站不作任何保证或承诺,请读者仅作参考。