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星力捕鱼游戏2020年05月22日08时40分36秒

时间:2020-05-27 01:53:32 作者:汽车大全 浏览量:41494

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】新浪搜狐体育 iuuAAARGA】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050u3Sf

XCPBThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsGwMk

kyI8How technolog/y i\s infl\uen【cing th】\e future of food and housing - whilst res】pecting/ the envi\ronmentcqc9r02z

LMavFi】nding gold i【n t【he gu【tt\ers of 【BrusselswScH

vUMsOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tags6CUn

YHyjAgriculture i【s facing a/ hi【storical challenge. In the next 3】0【 【ye【ars, food /demand will【 increa】se\ by 70 %.Facing this, it /will be necessary to i【ncrease an【d/ improv【e /production, /but al\/so】【 to lim】】it its impact on the env/ironment.Research/ers at Bio Sense institute, in Novi Sad, Serbia ar\e connecting sta【te-of-the-art technologies to crops to /cha【nge the productive model.Their mantra: "we c/annot feed\ today's world wit】h yes【ter//day 【agriculture".\And that is al/so】 the driving force behind t/he An【tares European project, which has developed a centre for ad/vanced technologies a【nd sustainable agric】ulture in this Se】rbian city located alongside the Danube.The【 Research/ Institute fo【r/ Information Technologies in】 Biosystems/ is part 】o【\f a Euro\pean funded programme to wide\n the participati/o】n of\ memb【er states and/ associated countr/i/【es who are lag【ging behind/ in /terms of res】earch and innovation.The Digit\al FarmAgriculture of the 【futu【re wil/l use 】advanced】 technologies, such as s/e【nsors, robots, drones, big data and sa】t\ellit】e/ ima/g/er/y."With a growing popul【a】tion, we need \to produce in t】【he/ next 40 years as much fo【od as we did in the pa】st 1/0000 years to\ do /that\," explai/ns Antar【es project coord】in/ator/ and electro\nics engi【ne】er, Vesna Bengin."We n【e\ed 【sensors a\nd senso】rs and some more sensors and some artific】ial intelligence on top of t【hat....to make our culture m【ore efficie\nt."Micro and nanoel】ectroni】cs de【\v/ices ena/ble farmers to c【heck th】e general s\ituation of the crops an】d sp/ot 【potential diseases at/ very early stages."Soil sensors will give 【you \the in\formation w/hen\ to irriga/t/\e and th/en not so you can diminish t\he amount of water tha\t】 is used for the ir】rigation \pro【cess," says 】Goran Kitić,/ the head of the nano-mic【ro-elec\tr】onics/ laboratory at the Biosense institute./"B】\ut/\ also we\'【re developing som\e sort of s【olutions that tell you how much of the food【 for /the plant is i/n the so\il h\ow muc【h nitrogen is in/ disarray."Several 'Digital Farm' pilot projects have alread/y been la】/\un/ched in Serbia."Digital【 agri【culture 】is t/he agric/ulture based on heavy u/s/e of d\ata\ so tha【t we are trying to 】colle/ct d】a】ta【/【 in opp【ortunis】tical【ly 【fr/om【 sensors,/ from 】the soil, fr\om plants, animals, sate/llites, drones you name it, in/ any p/ossible w】ay," e\xplain】s "d【irector of the Bi】o Se【n【se Instit【u/te,】 Vladimir Crnojević."And then 【to】 u】se the l/a/test 】closure like artificial intelligence, bi】g\【 data concept to find \s/om\e h】idden kn/o【wledge that is not】 obvious."The 】Agrosen【se platf【ormThe virtual】 【counter\part of the Digital 】Fa/rm \is the Agrosense platform.This comprehens】iv/e/ database a【llows farmers to 【plan\ the/ir\ activit【i/es and bett/er m【onit\or crop conditions, d\ue to figu/res comin】g from different sources, such as robots,\ 】optical se/nso\rs, algo\rit【hms, meteorolog】ical st/a】tions an】d satellite data.\"T【h/e system we currently use can iden\ti\fy proble/ms o/n \】a l【eaf, a fruit o【r a vegetable, so we can react \earlier\ th\an \when we might detect it. When w】e【 realiz/e【 it,【 the p【lant is already si】ck, whi】le\ \the camera and t】he\ sensors can de【tect the 【beginning of the disea】se\, " says fa\rmer/,【 Djordje Dju\kic.Satel】lit】e images coming from Copernicus\ European Earth Observatio/n Progr\amme, along with drone thermal vie/ws and smartphone's photos pr【ovide f\ur【t】her in-dep】th inf【ormation about the biol】ogical paramete【rs\ of the /crop and\ t】he f\ield.F】armers c【an al\】so exchange data, send】 pictures,】 rec//eive information o【n how much fertili/zer to use to dispense o】r how to 】optimize irrigation, via sm【ar【tphone apps.Real-time anal【ysis of the \g】【/round properties can be deli\/\vered direct【\ly【 on-/s】ite \by a/ robot /mov】ing n 】a\utonomously through the field and sam】pling the soil.This allows designers to t/a\ilor-make/ the land ma\nagement sys\tem, even on small p\articl/es of the f】ield."This will【 give you the 】results in 1【0 minutes 】an/】d 】you will instantly /know what】'/s the /si】tua/tio】n li\ke, you \w】ill hav【e// a map and\ th/is /wil】l help the 】】farmer to【 be more efficient," sa】ys Goran/ Kitić, the head of nanomicroelectron/ics lab】or】atory at th\e Bios/ense ins/titu/te.The【 resurgenc\e of woodThe c\onst\ruct\ion sector worldwide is res】ponsibl【e for one\-third of al】l the CO2 emission【s and 40% of\ all the/ 】】wastes.Bu\【t sci【entists】 \be/lieve that wood can /ha\ve great】 potential as a carbon sink and offset o/f CO2 emissions. Woo【d has been o】ne of】 the mos\t /exploit\ed b【uilding ma\te\rials throughout history. Mode/rn time】s has s【ee】\n/ 】the 】dominatio\n of ste】el and concrete\, but wood 【is【 once 】again on \the rise.In【 \】Slovenia, the InnoRene【w【 CoE project, a/ r/esearch centre \】/of excell【ence has been crea\t/ed【 to/ deve【lop new b/uilding mat】erials based o【n wo】od and recyc\l/able na\tural prod】u/ct/s."T/imber constru】ctions, /as well 【as the search for new materials \based on natural products】, are ab/out to become more common."By combining c\hemi【str【y/ and com/puter science, material science, we can cr/e】at】e mat【erial that\ can be used in the building where the /people are f/eeling the p【\ositive impacts on the【ir percept】io\n tow【ards the livi/ng\ environment," sa【ys Andreja Kutnar, InnoR【enew CoE project /coordi】nato/r and /p】rofesso/r 】of wood science and tech【nology a】t t\he University of Primors】ka, Koper."/】it's \very sustainabl】e .\..because \when w】e cut/ the【 t\ree 【at the same tim】【e w/e pla\nt another one"Wood /】m\】odification/】 process【es also al】low desired proper】ties to be produ//ced by m\eans \of \【chemical, 】\biologica\l or phy【sica【l agents. And this can co】ntribute t/o re/ducing the envi】ro\nmental footprint and /economic cost【 o】f wood 【maintenance."Wood is basically the champi】on of all the r\enewab】le ma【terial. \】It's not only it's carbon neutral it's actually carbon negative. 【So basically when /you make a wooden house not only you【 d/idn't \r/ea\lly emit any CO2 we were actually s】toring】 it /in the【 construction /itself," says Iztok &Scaro/n;u&/scaron;ter&s/caro】n;i【69; , a research group le\ader at/ the Innorenew Cen\tre of 【Excellence (CoE).Architect/s】 are【 \also lookin\g with interes】t at【 wood【【 【as a we】ll-being solution. A topic of our interest is i\ts con/nection to t【he\ well-bein\g of p】eople. "How 【【buildin/gs can reduce stress. How it can improve health," says Eva \Prelov【&scar【on\;ek Ni\/em\el】ä, a\n【 a】rchitect at Innorenew CoE.Scientific evidence h\as\ confirmed the positiv/e /imp【act of wood in w/orkin】g and li【ving spaces.Michael Burnard,\ the de\puty di\rector of the Innorenew Centre of Ex\cellen】ce say【s "people tend to find t/\he material mo/re pleasant to th】e tou/c【h and nic】er to work】 with."Researchers at the U\niversity of Primorska】 】hav/e also【 \bee【n studying\ prope/rtie】s hidden in natural sustainable ma】terials, as for example\, Cann】abis sativa.Its】【 fibre\s are unde/【rgoing】 a r\enaissance withi【n the construc\tion sec/tor, because of t【h\eir /m/echanical properties"What is in】\teresting is th】e 】m/】echanical performance of i/ts fibres, whic\h\ are almost s\】imilar to】 glass fi\bres】," expla\ins 】Laetitia M】ar】rot, /a researcher, at the I\nno【renew CoE."The he/mp plant is/ also used as an i\nsulation】 material, allowing the house to breathe. The plant will /naturally absorb /m/oisture whe】n there is too much 】or it will re/lease it when t\here is not enough in the air."Pairing the construction s【ector with su/staina\b/l【e/ forestry management cou\ld gener/ate a whole slew of a【ddition/al 【economic, social,】 and environmental b\enefits.1212121/2121212/12J】ournalist n【ame • K】】at/y\ DartfordShare this article】Copy/p\as/te the art】icle video 】embed /link below/:CopySh/areTweetSha/res【endShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareS\hare/Shar【eSendShare】S/hareYou might also like 【【 \ \ Italian/ sc/ientists believe jell【yfish will soon be a brand new \del\ic\acy in Eur/ope 【 / / 【 【 】 】 /\ Latest cutting-edge tech\nolo/gy showcased at J】apan【 trade show 【 【 】 【 \ 【 Cementing the future: the EU's【 ECO\B\/INDER pr\oject 】takes a /hard【 look at concre【te 【 / / / / Mo】re aboutEnvironme【ntal prote【ctio/nNew technologiesResearchAgri/cul\tureArchitecture 】 【 M】ost viewed 【/ 【\ 】 】 】 】 Wha/t influence on climate i//s the coronavirus loc/kdown really having? \/ \ 【 The new AI system\ safeguarding pr\ema\tur\e babies fr\om infect】ion \ / 】 【 Messeng/er/ RNA: the molecule that may teac【【\h our b/\odies to beat cancer \ Appl/e【 and Goog【le say the】y'll work together to trace spr【ead of coronav\irus via smartpho】nes / 【 \ \ 】 】/ How EU funding is】\ chang【ing the face 】【\of Lat】vi\an innovation 【 / / Browse today's tagsfhHi

The cement industry is r\esponsible for between 6 to 8 per \cent of global carbon【【 di【oxid\e emissions.Re\searchers looking 】into how to impro【ve the situation h【ave designe】d 】and built【【\】 an experime】】nt//al plant at a cement fact【ory in Belgi\um to try to \find soluti【ons.The factory, whi【ch covers around 70 hectare【s and employs 】around 1 workers, produces an estimated 1.4 million tonnes of 1/】 /di【fferent varieties of cemen/t from a common r】aw material: /limestone.But【 this 】comes wit/h an en】vironmental cost:/"I/f 【we produce one tonne of cement, we generate 0.6\ tonnes of carbon dioxide/. \This carbon 【dioxide main【ly c\omes from】 our raw m】ater【ial】s," s/ays Ja\n 】Theulen, direct/】or of】 al】ternative resource】s at \Heidelberg 】cement.Therefo/re, we need\ to de/velop】 te\chnologies to capture this c\arbon dioxide so that it is not e【mitted to the env/\ir【onment."The factory \has teamed up 【】with rese【archers from the Europea/【n research project, Leilac (\Low Emissions Intensity Lim】e And Cement)】 to search【 for such 】technolog/\ie\s.The outcome is a 6【0-meter/ high plant wit】h a pi【lot reactor th】at&\acute;'s alre\ady able to a/bsor【\【b 5 per c】ent of t】he f\actory&\acu】】te【;s total carbon dioxide emissi】ons\."【Ther\e is a big metal tube/ that´s heat\ed on t/he\ outside 【at /around【 a 1,000 deg】rees.\ The raw material is dropped in the top an\d it falls slowly d/own/. As this mate】rial】 gets heated,】/ it r/ele/ases its carbon d/ioxide. A\n【d th】is pure carbon dioxide c【an sim/ply be captured a【t the to/p," e】xpla\】in】s Leilac project coordin】ator, Daniel Rennie.Researche/rs say the tech】nology \requires 【minimal /chan【ges i【n the factory】&acut\e;s \con/ventional chain of 】cement production, \enabling the capture 】of ca\rbon dioxid【e with/o\ut additional chemicals.Bu/t there are stil】/l differ/ent【 challenges】 th\at need to be addressed."The materi】al /has to be【 able to flow 】do\wn the re】actor. It f】lows down the\ rea/ctor/, b】ut】/ then at the bottom, it n\eeds/ to be co/nveyed \i/n】to the o【th】er units /on sit\e," sa】y/s T/homas Hills, a process engineer, at Calix."T/he 】other/\ impo/rtant technical/ par/amet】ers are ensur\i【ng tha【t we get enough heat into】 the reacto【r and that we put this h【eat in t【h/e right places."The a/i】\m is to be ab】le 】to absorb as mu\ch carb】on 【diox\ide as possible in the safest, m/ost【/ en【erg】y-efficient way.Researc\hers n】eed to constantly assess the safety and efficiency of the whole/【 proce/ss \bo\th】 【\i【\n a co/ntroll/ed laboratory environment and in the\ reactor its\elf\."We take the powder 【befor】e it /go/\es in and measure t/he amount o【f c\arbon dioxide t【hat goes in】 it,"】 】says Hills."Then we measure after pass\ing throu/gh the 【reactor, and we measure【 【that amount of \c/arbon dioxi【de in the powder. And the di/】【ffer】ence is t//he amount \that we cap【tur【e."Researchers\ are now working 】to scale up the tec【hnology 】to captu\re 95 p】er】 cent of the fact/ory´s global carbon dioxide emissio】ns with a view to dev】elopi\ng other circular【 economy 】business models."Be/caus/e we 】are expecting very pure carbon dioxi\de to 】【be cap【tu/red, with】 some purification steps it can /【be/ used for the foo\d industry, it// can \be used for /growing/ plants, it【 can be used for helping /make n】ew fuels, /it can even 【be used in/ m【aterials to help build new prod【ucts【, " says Daniel】 Rennie.\Researchers be【liev\e the t\echn/olog/y can contr\i【bute to reaching the target of 80% re\duction in 【car\bon dioxide emissions i/n Eu】rope by 2050.Journalist name • Ka\ty Dar【t/for/dShare this 】articleCopy/paste the articl】e video embed link below】:Co【pyShareTweetShar【/esendSh【areTwe】etSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【】are】ShareSh\a】r\eSendShareShar【eY】o】u might also like \ 【 / 】 \ How to increase bio/div/ersity acros】s cities / \ \ \ 】 \ 】 N【e【【w windturbines for green e【ne【rg【/y, che】ape【r a】nd \quicker to build 】 More a】boutIndustry】New technologiesE\n/vir【onmental protec/tion 】 \ Most viewe/d / W\/hat i\nfluence on \climate is the coronavirus lockdown really ha\ving【【?【 【 【 \ Th【\e ne【w AI system safeguarding prema【ture bab/ies from infect【ion / 】 】 /】 【 Messenger RNA: \the molecul【e \that /may teach 】o】ur bodies to beat \cancer / 【 / \ 【Apple an】d Google say t】hey'll work together to trace s【pre【ad /of coron\avi/rus via smartphones 【\ 】 【】 How EU funding is changing the f/ace of Latvia【n innovat/ion 【【 \ Browse today/'s 】ta/gs

xJHEA\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】skkeV

WertTex\【t size\AaAaIn a historic \m】ove for the/ /east A/frican nation, Ethio【p【ia 】has this】 week announced a tree-p/lan】ting/ initia【tive, vi】a/ UN Environment, to outd\o vir【t/ual】ly any/ ot\he【r country in the world. Based /initially at the Gu】le/le Botanical Garden in the capital of Ad/dis Ababa, volunte/ers \be\gan pla】nting 350 million tr\ees 】spanning r\ight across the country. In\ just /12 hours, the world record was broken, in an \ad】m/irable attempt to combat the effects of】 de\fo】restatio】n a/nd cli】【】mate change. By fu【】l/fill\/in【g\ the tree-plantin/g re】cord,/ th【e】 c】ountry is surpassing i/ts Green Legacy goal, 【conceived by Eth】io】】pian】 Pr/ime Minister/ A\】b】iy Ahmed, o/f pla\/nting 2A】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050 million tr】ees\ in a day【 at over 1,】000 sites.The /l/ast country \to attempt【 su【c\h a feat was India, who have been reigning\ cha/mpi【on】s since 1 when they planted 49.3 million trees in\ just one【 day, invo【lving 800,000 vo】lunt【eers. Equally, back【 in/ /2018, China announced plans to 【plan\t forests c\overing an area rou【ghly the size of /Ireland and the UK, one of the least\ forested countries】 in Europe \(13% according t【o /Forest R【esearch), spent 】£.7 million to develop a new north】【ern forest 【】in 20【【18. Co\uld the trend o/】f countries competing /\to plant the mo/st saplings be catching on?】E/thiopia's Prime Min/ister Abiy A【hm/ed, A/ugus\t 2019ReutersThe United /Nations En【】vi】ronment】, al\o】\ng with ot\her international organisati【ons, all backe\d the initiati】ve, believing firmly in the /power of tree rest】oration\ in //helpi\n】g to a/bsorb carbon dioxid】e, a m/ajor propell】er\ of global heati\ng./What is Aff【ore【station and /why does it】 help the p】lanet?Tr\ee-planting is called 】afforestation, quite\ simply, the op】posite】 o【【f deforestation. Many studies, 】including o【ne conducted by A/】merica/n scientific journ【al PNAS in 2017\, hav\e document【【\ed /that restoring forest\s in】 their natural f】or\ms is】 \one of, if not the s【in】gle mos】t, efficient an【swer to】 improving global wa\rming.Acco】rdin/g to the UN, f】orest \coverage in Ethiopia has d/eclined drastically since the/ start of the century, reaching a \l】ow of just 4% i】n the early\ 2000s【, /as opposed to 35% 【100 years ago. So, ac/tion had to be take】n to improve 】the /leve\l \of 【e/missions in the atmosph【ere, i/n the】 form of this ambitious】 task.Wh【at h\appen\s is, /trees and vege\tatio\n absorb t\he excess carbon dioxid】e \】we emi\t due \to human a\ctiv【ity with fossil fuel】s,\ meani】n\】g tha\t th\e CO2 c\an be st【ored, and the heat absorbed. In this way, the he\ating of t【he planet【 is lessened and, in turn, the tr【ees he/lp to preserve /the ec【osystems be/neath th/em/【\ and ensure si/gnificant e】nvironme】nta【l benefits/ as a who\le. F/or \instance, en\c/ou\raging rainfall, pr\oviding clean water, r】edu【ci/ng air pol【lution,】 and impr/ov】ing the livelihoods for local peopl\e in s/urr】ounding areas.Nature\ Va【lley\, AfricaJuliette B【iao Koudenoukpo,\ Dir【ector of UN\ Environment&rsq】uo;s Africa Office explain/【s in an official statemen/t:&\ldquo;Afforestation is t\he most ef\fective climate cha】nge 】solution to date a\nd with the ne/w record set by Ethiopia, other African na】\tio】ns should move with speed and chal\lenge the status quo.&【rdquo;“Africa has what 【it take/s to spearhead thi\s glo【bal pu/sh and as the most affected and v【ulnerable c\ontinent, \clim【ate cha/nge miti/gation must 】be \the\ \t/opmost pr/io】rity in the comi【ng da】ys. We at【 UN Environment are taking the lead\ in helping to build capacity 【for\ nations and people to 】ap【ply/ /th\emselves to afforestation and climate chang/\e mitigation strategies.”353,633,6/60 Tree Seedlings Pl】an/ted in 【12 Hours. This【 is/【 i/n /【#Ethiop\iansRegional Shares of T】rees Pla\nted toda\y.#P】MOEthiopi/a#Green】LegacyEthiopiapic.twitter.co】m/2BkTD/tYedC&mdas//h; D【r.-Ing.【 Geta\hun Mekuria (@DrGetahun) July 29, 2019Ultimate\ly, t/he goa\l is f\or 4 b\illion【】 ind】igenous trees to be planted /acr/o/\ss the dr/o】ught-prone nation, rep\orts the BBC, w/hich will make 【an en\ormous difference to t【he】 stability of the【 climate.Share this article More from pla】cesWtas

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nw7tFrom Amsterdam】 to Sy【dney on el【ec/t/r\icity4o1R

Yi5iThe world's highest/-op\erating\ weather st\ations have been installed on M\ount\ Everest, a【ccording to th】e Nation【al Geogr\aphi【c Society. The】y \were placed 】at 8,4/30\ metres and 7,945 metre【s as part \of a three-mon/th scien/tific】/ 【assessme\nt of\ the planet's t/allest peak.The expedition t】eam set o【ut to Everest to gain a deeper understanding of/ t】he/ 【effects of cli】mate change on t【he Kara【koram\ glacie\r/ r】【ange. Due to【 increasing global temp【eratu【res, t\hese glaciers have b【een rapidly disap】pearing, sa\y the scientists.【The/ geol】ogy team from Nat【ional Ge【【ographic【 and Rolex's【 Perp\etual Planet Extreme Expediti/onNATIONALGEOGRAPHIC/FREDDIEWILKINSONNATI/ONA/LGEOGRAP】HIC/FREDDI【EWILK\INSONTh【e extreme weath\er conditions ra】vaging this 【region\ has m\ad【e studying th【e effects o/f】 climate cha\】nge \on】 the are【a accurately nearly impossible. Th\e rese】arch completed on the expedi/tion "will fill critical data g】aps on the【 world&【rsquo;s life/ support sy】stems and drive solutions\ to /assur】e tha】t they c\a】n c/ont\】inue to fuel our future,&rd【quo; says executive director /Jonath\on Baille./A】 night wi【nd spins an anemometer\ at a 【weat/h\er stati/on installe】d during Nati【onal/\/ Geog/rap】h】ic 【a\nd Rolex's 2019 Perpetual P】l\【anet Extreme Exp\edition to Mt. Ev\erest/NATIONAL】GEOGRAPHIC/ERICDAFTNATION【AL/【GEOGRA\PHI/C【/E【RICD\AFTTo und【ertake /the stu\dy, cl//imate scientists researched bi】olo【gy, geology,【 glacio\l【ogy, map【ping,】 and\ meteorology in /the Karakora】m range. The】se fields of science, they \believe, are the most critical in understanding the e\ffects of cl【imate c/hange on t【he env】iron【ment.A total】 of five weather stations were installed on Everest/ and l/ive updates from the station are available at the Nati\onal Geo/graph【ic webs【】ite.Share this articleShareTweetSharese【ndShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShare\S/hareSendShareShareYou mig【h/t 【als/o lik\e 】 Watch/: River of clouds descends on Alpine valley【 】 \ 】 \ 【 / \ New coronavirus /not the 】\real killer: 【\it\&#】】039;s the pat\ient s 】im】\mune system\ damaging vital organs 【 】 】 】 /\ /France w/arn/s of serious side ef\】fects of c\oronavirus ‘miracle cu/res’ / 【 \ / 【 / M/o】re aboutClima/teScience/Environmental protectionWea】therHot TopicL/earn more about Clima\te Hot TopicL/earn more ab\out 【Climate 【 】 Brow/se tod\ay&【#039;s tagss9ep

Ev9BBy 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsEATS

x4DNProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seasaClo

ZJ73Green growth: promot/ing i【n【n】ovation and sus/ta\in/ability to foster busines\s in Europe\XYuW

hQe0What is/ enviro】nment【al crime 】a【nd sho\uld /you re\p\ort it?【/ 【0iFe

3oFiFor】 the first time\ E/【U Finance Min【ister】s are calli/ng【 on the European Investment Bank to halt funding of oil, gas 【and coal projects.Mika/ Lintilä【;, 】【min【iste】r of financ【e of Finland s\aid:&l】dquo;Since 2013, 】w\e \have /m\ore 【tha\n doub【l/e/d o\ur fina【ncia】l c\on】tributions\ to h【elp developing countr【i\/es reduce th【ei】r gr】eenhouse gas emission】s【 and c】ope with the imp/act of climate change. “But it is the\ 【European Inve】st】ment Bank that is right in the heart of/ /the so-called European Green dea】l】 - 【an ambitious p\lan announced 】by t\he Com\mission&rsq/uo;s n/ew】 President.The EU finance ministers&rsquo【; /call comes】 as a crucial mov\e in t/】he【 run up to the COP/, the UN climate change conference./ Within 】the p\rop】osed Green/ Dea】l 【- which the new Commi】】ssion 】promised to frame within t】he f/irst 100 days the Eu\ropean Investment Bank will 【be in c【harge\ with fi】nancing the transition.The \European Investment Bank i【s】 set 【/to /turn into European Climate B\ank."There is【 a very im】po\rtant【 aspect of tra】nsiti】on. and we】 h/ave seen that o】n all protests, n】ot onl\y /young\/ peo【\ple, but also yellow ves\ts,"/ explai】ns Na\ncy S【aich, EIB Chief climate cha/nge expert continuing, "If we don&r【squo;t ad\dress peo\ple's live/lihoods, they j】ob】s, if thei/r jobs are at ri/sk 】be【c【ause t/hey are working in coal 】or they a/re worki/ng in a high em/i】\tting indust/ry - /if we don’t take that into account a/nd don’t give them opportun\ities 【for w【【ork and jobs in the futu\re】 - then we will not be ad】dr【essing everybody. We have to do this in an incl\usive way. And try to leave nobody behind/."9\】3% of European】s think clima】te ch\ange is a serious probl】em.Ac【cording to the/ r\ecent E】urobarometer research, climate chang【e has overtaken in/ternat\ional terrorism as the second most seri【ous pro】bl】e】【m afte\r 】poverty,\ hunger and/ lack of drinki\ng waterShare this articl【eShareTweetSha/resendShareTwe】\et】Sharesend【M【oreHideShareSe\ndSh\ar】eShareShareSendShareShareYou migh【t also li】ke 【 【 \ 【 Nort】h-south div】ide sta\ll/s EU de\cisi】\on 【on coron【avirus financial pack/age 】 】 【 / EU p/roject in danger if no solidar/ity on coro【navirus cris\i】s, says economy chief Gent/iloni】 【// 】 \ / 】 / \ 】 【/ C】OV】ID-19: EU leaders fail/ to agree on comm】on financi】a/l respo\nse dur\ing virtual summit 【 / More a【boutEurope【an /UnionEn//ergyE/nvir\onme/ntal protectionBanking Br【owse today's/】 tagsP9bm

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VQKTText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesPfPW

VTwvHi/ppos play a【【 key role in maintaining ecosys【】t【ems..\. wi/th their poop\ 【cc06

rgEg“The lo\nge/r the sup】ply 】chain, the m/ore 【is【 wasted/”FGtJ

1.vtODAmazon 'Forest Guardia/n&#】039】; shot in /the head by illegal loggers5iU1

2.YEuOOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tagsJjKE

3.dhafCoronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nk1B1

4.7q8mOur s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsWRWs

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AbTLText sizeAaAaJames Bo/nd actor】 J\avier Bardem has tak\】e/n to t【he streets of New York’s Tim】es Square【 to demand gre【】ate】r protection fo\r】 the worl【d’s oceans 【】ahead【【 of a mee/ting with th】e U/nite】d Nat\ions.The Oscar winner gave an 【imp/assioned spee】ch,\ \call/ing on deleg】ates at the U【N/ Convention on the Law \】of the Sea to agr\ee ta\rgets and give the green【 light to a Gl/obal Oce【ans Treaty./ Su\【ch an agreement /would increase the 】amount of international\ waters\ granted environmen/tal protection from 1% to 30% 】by【 2030.Bardem/ became an activ】ist with Gre/en【peace, focu【sin/g on】 p/rotection/ for An】tarctica at the//【 beginnin\g of\ last year.“The \ocean and its /inhabitants know no bou/ndaries. What ha】ppens in the /hig/h s/eas【, do/\e/sn&rsquo【;t stay /there. Whales, 【\turtles and fish don&rsquo/;t know our bo【r/ders/,&rdqu【o; Bard】em told【 the ass】em】bled media in Time\s 】Square.“They are a【ll co\nnected, and we 】are 】conne/ct\ed \to them.\ Our oce\ans are on the ve\rge of【 collapse and we】 have/\ all p/layed \a huge role in this. Now we mus/t all play\ our part to stop it by securing a st【ron】g Glob【al Ocean【 T【rea】ty.”Bard\em also 】pose/d for pi】ctur\【es alongside a ne】arly 6-metr/e tall【 sculptu\re of w】hales and turtles erec/】ted by Gr/ee】npeac【e outs【i【de N【ew York&【r【squo;s UN【 building. The artwork \rep\resented man】y of the threa】ts【 t/o】 mar】ine】 life from p/l/a\stic pollution to oil drilling, said the env/ironment charity.Threat of【 extinctio】nThi】s f\res【h pus】h【 for【 a Global Oceans Treaty】 comes after the Global Biodiversity Assess】ment Report found more tha\【n /a t/h\ir/d of marine mammals an\d shark speci【es are currently facing t\he threat o【f exti\nction. 】Gr【eenpea/ce has been\ campaigning/【 for th【e policy for more a decade, counting celebrities including Big Little \Lies\ star Shailene Woodley as】【 support\ers\.“Our o【ceans are in cr】isis and existing 【frame\work【s 】for safegu】【arding t【hem are inadequat【e. /Only 1% \of in【ter【national waters, which co】ver almost half the planet, are effecti】vely/ prote【ct/ed,” sa/id Will M\cCallum, Greenpeace o】ceans cam/pa【ign】er.The sculpture installed by Greenpeace depicts tu/rtles】 a/nd whales/ trapped in ghost gear©\【; Stephanie】 Ke【ith / Gr】eenpeace&ldquo【;Restorin】g the【 health of our oceans i\s critical in pre\】serving ma\rine life, tackling the clima/te crisis, and sustaining the lives and li\vel\ihoods of millio【ns of】 people who depend on them. A str】on】g Global Oc\ean \Treaty w/ill pave【 the way for a /【net】work of s】anct\uaries tha\t will p【lace at least a third】 o】f the【 world&rsquo】】;s oceans off-limit【s to hum/an activities.”Dr Essam Yassin Mohammed of t】he\ In/ternation\al Institute for Env\i】ronme】nt and Development said i/t was【 &l\dquo;/surprising&r】dquo; no such /laws were alread【y in effect, su\g】gesti【ng the/ 】n\【ew treaty s/hould pre\vent unsustainable fishing and ensure pari【ty 【of access for developing countries.&ld/quo;Th【e equi】table distributi】o】n of /conse】rvat\ion benefi【ts of /the high seas shou/ld \also be【 at 【the core of the negotiatio/ns. Any ne】w global agreement must ensure that /】de】sign/ated protec】ted ar【e【as consi\de】r h\ow to sup【port coastal communities ac\ross the developing world.”Share this a/rticle 【 More from lifeMP2F

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jiW4Text sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from places6hwl

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q2vuLife under /t】he s【ea【 is at risk\. I】nternational tar】gets for pro\tecting /biod/iversity appear t/\o\/ be out of reach/. By 2020】, 】countries w【ith a co\astline must 】】esta【blish【 Marine Protected/ Areas (MPAs) to ensure the conservation of wildlife\ and flora. According to a stu//dy by the WWF, 】the European Union is far from leading the way/."We have 23 M/ember S【ta\tes w\ith marine area in the EU. 1】9 of these】【 are under the %【 limit of 【hav\ing effective mana/】gement /\for 】protected areas and w/ith just【 one year to go. And what's even mor【e alarming is tha/t half of the【m, 1//1 of them, have no 【manage【ment pl【ans what【soever, de\veloped or reported," exp【lai【ns Jani】ca Borg, Mari】ne Protecti\o【n an】d Spatial Plann】in\g Policy Coordinator a【t the WWF/ Europea】n Policy Office an/d lead author.EU \countries should/ set aside nearly 12% of their marine areas 】as mari【ne protected are】as. But according to the\ NGO, the bloc's share curr】ently accounts for less t】han 2%."I【'm d\isappoi\nted because fr/om the point o\】f】 view o\f the fishing industry marine prot/ected ar/eas offer /g】reat opport【unities to provid\e nurseri/es\ fo\r fish 【an/d to allow the fish to become\ bigger.\【 And/ as we know bigger i\s be】tter beca//use 】big fish breed in/ more numbe\rs. So ma【r/ine p/r\o【tecte/d are\a】s, /10】%, 15%, provide a g【r/eat bac\kground for 【a fish/ing in\dustry," Chr/is DAVIES (UK), Member of the Eur\opean Parliament,\ Renew Europe gro】up, cha】ir of the Comm】itte\e 【on Fisheries told Euronews.The protection o\f b【iodi\ver\sity varies from\ one ma\ritim】e area【 to another\. Addi【tio【nal efforts are needed\ in the Mediter【ranean and th】e Bl\【】/ack Sea. Without the】se】 marine pro【tected areas, \th/e survival of our oc/】eans is at risk.Share this articleCopy/paste】 the 【】arti【cle video/ \embed link be】【low:【Co【pyShareT/weet\SharesendShar/eTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareSh\areShareSendShareSh/areYou m/ig/ht 】al【so like 】 /Watch:/ Rescuers /save Orcas stranded on Argen【t【in】e b】each / 【 / E【U fis】h quota \quarrel -【 min【isters】 hail d【eal, NGOs/ 【sl//am overfishi】ng】 【 【 \/\ / 【 The/ Battle for】 /Brussels roads 【 \ More aboutEnv【i\ronmenta\】l protectionPollutionWWF 】 Browse today】's tagsGIbv

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JAI5T/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifeDk8i

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MQPYTex/t sizeAaAaOn【e in four workers】 would take a pay cut to /do/ w】ork that&rsquo\;s bett】er \fo】r the envir/onment, a】ccor/din】g to new【 re【search 【by【/ careers sit【e Totaljobs. That figu/re rises t【o half among millennials, aged\ 23-38.】Al\so known as Generation Z, mi【llennials told res】earchers they’】d be wi【lling t【o /drop &pou\nd;11,0 from their 【salaries o】n average【. That compare\s to £3,800 \Genera【tion X respond】ents【 aged b】etween 39-54 said they’d be willing/ to forgo for a g/reener j】ob role.In the UK, the\ surv【ey found 60% of j【obs】eekers resear\ched a potent/ial\ employe】r’/s sustainabilit\y and 】environme】nt cr\edentia/ls before/ accepting a positio】n. M\eanwhile, \f\our in every five empl【oyees【\ though\t comp\anies had/ a re【spons【ibility to lo\o/k after /the【 environment,【 with thre【e\ in【 f】ive agreeing their employers should be /【do】ing more.Read more | Noughti\e/s\ rap legend Akon to build gre/en cityA\roun/d th/e same amou/nt were\ willing to accept cuts in sp】【ending on activitie\s like team lunche\s, furniture an【d events.Environment\ attitudes inspi/red by David Att】enb/orough an\d Greta ThunbergSome 18% of wo【rkers/ in g\en/eral an/d 34% mi/llennial【s reported\ that they \would refu/se t【o work for a company 】they thought wa\s har】ming the natural world. The majority said they w】ere m/ore interest【ed in cl\imate issues】\【 than t】\hey wer\e five years ag\o, sayi【n/g a hig/her profi【le【 in the\ /media ha\d drawn【 their attenti【on.Greta Th\unberg】 arrives \in Spain for】 COP 25Copyrigh\t 2019 \The Associated Press.】 All r/ights reservedPedr【o RochaT\he influen【ce of n/at\ural】ist a\nd broadcaster Sir【 David Attenb【orough and young ac【tiv】ist G【reta Th/unberg were 】also cited as key drive/rs for pe】opl【e to\ cut their carbon footprint.“It has ne\ver bee【n more \i/mportant f/\or busi【nesses to be 【par\t of th】e solution to 【our pl】anetary /c【rises,” said Gudrun \C/artwright, envi【ronment d\irector 】at Bus】iness i【n the Community.【&ldquo/;Young people are no 】long】er begging leaders 】to 】change but tell】ing them /that cha/nge is comi\ng re\gardles【s. Businesses that i】gno】re\ it /face an imminent\ exis\te】ntial threat. Our futures depend on \rapid,【 】ambit/ious action, and we can all make a differen【ce.”Sh【are this article More from li\fe499l

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