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a8体育2020年06月02日09时50分14秒

时间:2020-06-02 09:50:16 作者:最新看点 浏览量:91882

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】百度音乐 nx1RgfWGIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gscKvv

AcHxPush to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers2Dyf

WHbPItalian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effectBgw4vvJ8

Jk0PDanish billio\n】aire plans to b/uild idyllic vil\lage in【 Sc\ot/\land to stop land】 becomi//ng de\relictqx5s

hREITe】xt size【A/aAaA【 group of British women ar【e set to\ prove th/\at in t\he【 UK, where the economy once has be/en s【haped by the textile】 i\ndustry/, it is s【till commercially viable to re\-【crea/te a l【ocal, r【esilient texti】l\e economy. They a【im to offer an】 al【ternat】ive to/ th】e \u【nsustainable global textile produc\ti【on s】ystems which /hav】e threatened /traditional British cloths almost to /exti】nction.The project takes place】, of cours\e, in Bristol the UK’【s greene\st city, the European Green Capital in/ 2015. I】n tha\t year the loca/l weav】in\g mill start\ed operating, it was the firs】t /industr】ial\ loo】m to open in the ci【t\y in almost a century.\ Th\is m【ill has be/】com\e part of /the Bristol Cloth proj/e】ct, a fabric manufacture】r to produce the UK's\ first rege\nera【tive/ non-toxic tex】tile."The】 f\arm 【we source the wo\o/l from - Fernhill fa【rm 】- uses “holistic farm\in\g&rdqu\o; techniques, it means mimick】ing natural \herd \grazing\ pattern【s," explai\ns【 the bac】k【ground \B\ab/s Beha\【n, the F【【oun/ding Director of Bri】stol Cloth project &a【mp】; Botanic【al 】Inks. "Lots of /animals】 ar【e kept together in one area 】putting lots \o/f 【nutri【/e【nts back into the soil. 】T【hey are however moved o\n quickly s【【o always have fresh new pasture to 【graze\ on. The pl\ants in th【e soil get a long time until t】h\e\ /herd 【ret】urn/ to that place. Meaning\ tha】【t a diverse speci\es\ of \pl【ants get【 to grow - all putting a varie/ty of nu/trients an\d mine【rals into the soil【. And they get【 to grow tall and /therefore also\ get deep roots,【 and t】hi】s is what makes them】 able to capture more/ car\bon from t】he air and lock it back into the soi\l- this is wh】at makes i】/t carb/on sequestering and climate neutralising."Anot\【he】r important part of 】th/e proc】ess i\s using natural m】ater\ia/ls for the colouring, such/ as plants, minerals and in【sect\s. \(A/ro/und the world,】 \an estimate【d 17 t/o 20% of industrial water】 pollution comes fro\m textile dyeing and treatment an【d an est】imated 8】,000 synthetic chemic【als are us/ed to turn raw mat/erials into 【\te【x/tiles, many /o/f which will be releas/ed into f】re/shwater sourc\es.)【As the clo/th is made from natural fibre and plant\ 】d】\yes and no toxic synthetic c】/h【emica/ls, i\t is safe 】t/o go back i】n/to the ground after i\t’s u】sef/ul life cycle and actually o/\】ffer nutrients back/ to// the soil.The project has r/aised more than £12,】000【 v\ia a crowdfunding ca/mp】aign to produce the first 200 metres of the Bristol 【Cloth/.\】Cli/ck on the/】 video above to lear\n more about /the proje】ct.Share th】is article 【 Mor\e from styleUwgw

Z42WTe/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 stylem3MO

Good c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rules

AisV【The Green Revol【ution - fast【e【r, cheaper and more eff/icient teles\copic w/indt【urbines 【4b4n

mUc2T\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellnessr8Lz

0zhuG\r【eece \told to �/39;save your 【paradi\se as oi】l \compa【n【ies move inLnGL

IiIUO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsC4In

CaihDanish fisheries take back contr】olcCuo

7xGPT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifeW2ow

RwHDAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tags9yzs

7hmkWhen art/】 is a force for goodBVxo

W5vYNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysiGnF

eT5bFor many ages, D】anish fishermen have been u\si】ng cl/】inker-built oaken boats, ligh/\】twei/ght and\ flex/ibl】e enough to land directly on 】sand beaches. Thi【s t\raditi】ona】\l 【/wa】y of coastal fishing is considered【 】】more friendly to the marine environment than large-scale \【industri【al me\thods.【But can the boat-b/uilding craft survive the curren【t decli】ne 【of Danis/h\ fishing vi/llages? Fish/ermen and other activists fro】m the Jammerbugt mun【icip\ality of Denmark are \hopi【ng t\o preserve the tradit【ion for at least \anothe\r 100/ years by b\ui\lding 10 new N\ordic 【sea boats for the \young gener/ation of small-scale coastal fishers. Their asso/ciation【, &ldq/uo;Ocean/【 in Balance”, has laun\ched a public cam【paig】n aiming to raise 7/,150,000\ euro【s for th】e boats.【I【n this 360-degree video, Thomas H【øjr【up, the chairman of/ &ldqu\o;Ocean in Balance”, sh\ows us around \a clink】er-built bo\at curren】tly u】n/der cons【truction, exp】laining \the un\ique way the\se boats are de/signed 】and b/ui【lt.【】Journalist name/ • Denis Loc】tierV【i】deo e】d【\it】【or • De\nis 】】LoctierShare this artic/leShare】TweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideSha\reSendSha/reShareShareSendShareSha/reYou\ might al】/so l】ike 】 【 】 \Dan【i/sh fisheries t【ak】】e back 】contro\l 【 】 【 / \ \ 】 How small scal【e fisheries saved Da【nish】 fishi/ng communi【ti【e】s 】 】【 【 \ What’s killing our unde\r】water ecosystems? 【 More abo\ut360° videoFisheryD\e/nmarkEnviron\m\ental protection \ Most 【viewed 】【 】 \ 【 】 】 What 【i//nfluence on climate is the coronav】irus lockdown re】ally having? \ 【 \ / 】 T\he new \AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from】 infection \ / 【【 \Messenger RNA: th【e molecule t\ha】t may 】teach our bodies to b【eat cancer /【】 /【 】 \ \ Apple and Google/ say they【9;ll wo【rk toge】ther to 】trace spread of coron/avirus via smart【phones \ How EU funding i\s c/hanging th\e face/ o【f Latvian\ inn】ov】ation 】 \ Br】owse today�s tag/swJyo

ffRFText s\izeAaAaAlt】hough he wa\s only born in 1984, Hung/arian G\&a//acut\e;bor M【iklós Szőke is\ al【ready a promi/】nent artist of the contempor【ary \sc【ulpture scene in Budapest/\. His main a【rtwor\k/s are public an/imal】 /sculp\tures, \noticeable for】 their “lath-style” and enor/mous si/ze. He prefers to\ work with stainless steel an/d hardwood 】ra】th/er /than traditional marble and bro【nze to give/ his art a more "mo】dern aesthetic"\.The A】tlanta Falcons recently c/ommis】sioned/ the arti\st t/o erect a giant falcon 【statu【/e in time for【 the open/ing】 of【 their n【ew Mer【cedes-Benz Stadi/\u【/m. /With a wingspan of\ /21 meters\ and a heig/ht/ of 13/ meters\, 【the mas】sive stai\nless steel sculpture \【is now the largest bird re/presen/tation in the worl【d. “Calo\/ssus” in Samo【rin \is the larges\t equine st】atue】 in \Europ【e. Other sculptures\ 】by G【ábor can be found arou/nd the world fro】\/m 】Gstaad\ to \Bahrain, 】Washi】ng\ton\ D.C. \to Niz【h/ny Novgorod. View/ this post on In】stagramMa 4 é【ve avat【tuk sz&ia/cute;vemhez egyik legközelebb álló szobromat, a 】Frad\i sa\st, Európa le【gnagyo【bb á】l】l/and&\oacute; k&o/】uml;ztéri mad&aa】cu\te;rszobr&aa】\/cute;t, am/elyet a vilá】\gon sz/in【te mindenhol】 ismernek. A】z a szeretet és b&uum/l;szkeség, amit szobromo\n \keresztül a\z&oacu【te;ta is k/apok nap, mint n\ap, felbecsülhetetle\n, 】e】zúttal kösz&】ouml;】nöm! Hajrá F【radi! ?【???【 #ftc #eag】le #hajrafra/di #gaborms【zoke 】#bud】apest #hung/aryA post shar【ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\ist (@gab/ormszoke) o\n Aug 9, 2018 at 4:25am PDTIt’s 】【not a surprise /H\ungar\/ian 【media call\】 him “H/un/gary/&rs/quo;s \coolest export” a\nd that he made it into Hungarian Fo\rbes】 Magazin】e&rs】quo;s “【T/op 10 under\/ 30&rdq\uo/; in 2015, or t/hat he has received】 numerous national and international aw【ard【s. Despit】e all the 【success at suc\h a young age, G【&aacu【te;bor never 】/forg\et【s that his sculptu/res are not just about inst【antl/y recogniz\abl】】e 】shape】s and shee\r magnitud/e. View 【this post on InstagramRise Up! /T\his mott【o【 can\ best /desc/ri/be】\ m【y sculpture\, the A/tlanta Falcon! S/he is proud, f】ree \and authoritative at the\】 same time.】 \I c】a】n't wai/t/ t【o see her again! 】???? @mercedesbenzstadium #amb】se #mbs\art #merc【edesbenzstadium #atla【ntaga/ #sbliii #【atlan】t/afalcon #touchd/own #momen【t\ #riseup #publicsculpt】ure #】arr【 #desi\gn #co【ntempor/arya/rt #gabormszok】e #\【atlantafal】con/ #at】lantafal\cons #superbowl #【superbowl【53 #sbliii #a【tlantaA post shar/ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\i】st (@gaborm【szok/e\) o】n Jan 28,】 2019 \at 8\:03am PST【We sat d/ow\n with him and Berta Hauer, his\ man\ag【er and partner, /in】 their i【mpr【essive stu/dio locate】d \in/sid\e an 【】abandoned/ /f【actory in the/ south o/f Budapest, wh\ich won the d\esign of【fice of th】e year award in Hun】gary /i\n 2016,【 t【o \ask what's the message be】hind/ his ar\t. View th【is post 】on InstagramDante Imperium Part】y in the G【abor\【 M. Szok【【e Studio ????/???】???? #】dant【eimperiu\mbrut #prenyeparty #welcometom【yworld #industria】】lparty #【gabormszoke #studiolife #sex【 #danteem】pire w】\ith @b\ertaha/uer ❤ʊ【39; 】phot/o by @gregusmateA pos/t 】/shared by 】Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti\st (@gaborm】/szoke/) on Jan 5, 2018 】at 2\:05pm PST/When did your interest 【\/in art and sculp/ture begin?"I’ve been 【i【nvolved in crafts\ since child【hood. I a【lways drew /a l】ot and made little sculp/tu/res】. Twelve /years ag【o, I w\as a/t an art 【retr】eat wi】th\ my】\ univer】sity class\ma\tes and it \was there that I fi\rst/】 gathered w\ood planks/ and stic【ks\, a/nd rea\/liz\ed/ that it could 【actually be a pretty cool\ mean of artistic expression. It&rsq/uo;s almos】t like drawing thin【gs in spac/e【 whilst【 enablin】g you to 【mak【e massive art pieces. I quickly realized/ that this would b/e something big beca】u/se on the way back fro/m the art retreat I put the makeshift sc\ulp\ture\ 】【on top o】\f m【y car and【 /ever/yone was taking photos as I was driving【 away. So I decided to 】pursue t\his \style to make a bigger impression with my sculptu/res. It’s also a way of keeping things fr】o【m th/e past/ an\d /givin\g the【】\m a new exist\ence."What are the sustain\able methods /】a】nd p【ractices yo】u empl【oy\ in 【your a】rt?"My w\hole ar【tistic motto is /giv】ing old things new meanings, kind of 】lik】/e w【ith my stu\dio. Back in its glory days, the Manfr&e\acut】e;d Weiss Steel \and Metal Works he】re in Cse【pel【 was t【he second biggest in Europe. I’m r/eally inspired by old thin\gs because d【espit/e their age/, they tend 【to be】 mu\ch s【turdier【 than】 new ones.""Whe/neve\r I ca】n, I\ create my art from reused materials, tar\ a【nd found objects. Ten years ago around Chri\s【tmas time 】I】 was lef\t with a \lot 】of wood 】that I wou\ldn’t/ n\eed【 in the coming ye】ar. S】】o, in/stead\ of throwing it 【al/l out, I made l/ittle Christmas tree sculpt【ures and sold【 them. Since then, it /has become a/ 】traditi】on and I always do this around Christmas 】ti\】me】. 【On】 the o【n/e h/and, /nothing gets thrown away \and on the other it saves thousands of 【pine t\rees bec/ause 【people\ who【 buy my “trees” won’t be buy/ing real one】s for ma】ny years to come." View 【/this p\ost on InstagramChristmas gift 【alert/: My new X【mas】/ trees are out, save a tree and buy some/ a【rt☝️more/ i\nfo】r\mation/ 【on the /web】site, \click \on BIO;\)/??A post s/hared by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti/st (【@gabormszoke)\ on Nov 16, 201】8 at 【7:25am P】ST"Enviro\nmental a】wareness in ge/neral is 【something\ that/【 is very 】important for Berta an】d m【【/yself. B】ack in 20/10, righ【t /a\fter fi\nishing my s【tudie/s, I represented Hungary at a/n/ 】international art\ comp】etition o\rganized by th\e【 Collegiu】m Hungaricum Vienna. The th\eme was the Dan】ube Ri/ver. Unfortunately, &ld】quo;civilization” ha\s dec/imated the once v/ibra\nt river an\d turne\d it i】nto an oily, contaminate【d smu/dg/e. In \the Danube River, the sturg】eon is on the brink of extinction. Th】ese f/i【sh are e【xtremely sensit/ive to】 environmental p【re】ssures, making the\m/ valuable indicators for healt【hy【 rivers. To\ emphasize how dire the situation \is, I ga【\thered pla\stics and debris f【rom the Dan【ube to create "The Last Stu/rgeon" piece. These m/at【eria【ls, the manner of\ formulation, the fish&r【】s【quo;s f【ractured ski/n – all this re/fers to】 its unnatural 】way of perishing an/d \calls 【on the viewer to take greater responsib/ilit【y/ for our h】【itherto ne\gligent attitudes towards the species t【hat sh【are t【his planet 】with us【.""T\he Last /St】urgeon" sculpture in【 ViennaSoc\ial \responsibility\ in general is of great importance to 【you. What ar】e some of the\ most press\ing cause/s fo】r you c】urrently? How do you address them in your a】rt and what else are you【 doing 【to fight for th\】em?"In 2014, 】I wa/s// as/ked to create a symbol for t】he Tollwood F】esti\val in Munich/. This festival is k】n】own fo】r its stance \on envi\ronmental and /ani/mal 】welfare issues. T\hat year the f【\ocus was】 on the \ter】rible conditions endured by fa/rm animals 】so I create】d the “【Sad P【ig”, a gi/ant p【i【g statue t】hat i】s】 far too】 big for the nar/row ste\el cage it is forced to live in. A】【t that ti/me, Munich【 had/ the/ hi【】ghest pork consump\tion in\ all of/【 Europe/ so I \wa\nte】d to r\aise awareness about the animals’ t/ragic fates.""Sa】d Pig"/ at\ Tollwo】od Festival/"Sa【d Pig\" at Tollwood Festival"Also, I try【 to 【do/ what I ca/n for disadva】nta】ged a\】n\d minority communities /here\ in Hungary.\ In【\ 2012 I】/ took part in【 the c】haritable Hello Wood】 art camp/. I d\ec\id/ed to create a tot\em animal in the /form of a “Guardian Tiger” for one of th/e】 poorest v/illages in/ th【【e country, where m】ost members belong to the Roma /mino\rity. The villa//ge endured many hardships and muc】h violence in the pa】st】 】but with the【/ arrival o【f this/ 【“guardian】”】 came media attention and with】 \t【hat, 】g\overnment funds to raise the\ standard of 【/living in this villa/【ge. Th【e villagers love this tiger, t\ake great care/】 【of it, and 】or】ganiz】e an an【nua/l "Tig\er Festi】val". Seeing all this positive \im\pac\】t was one of 【the/ most touchin【g m/oments for me. By do【ing good, good】 cam/e \back to me a】s well because it was this project /t】hat g/ot【 【me global media \attention.""The Guard】ian Tiger【" sculpture"Af】ter the “Guardian Tiger&r【dquo;, the authorities】 of similarly disadvan】taged/ 】lo】c【ales\ started to g/】et in touch with me to brighten up/ the lives of thei\r citizens 【through art【. In 20【13】,【 I installed a guardi/an unicorn in the f【orest near t】he Russian town】 of Vyksa\,/ known for being the largest manufacturer of steel welde\d pipes and railway wheels 【in Russia. The magical creatu】r【e rem/in\ds pe【opl【e that you can be an individual even in a glum, i\ndustrial town. A \si】milar colourful unicorn was create\d the same year in Kazi【ncbarcika, an i\ndu】strial tow\n in Hungary full of apartments' blocks. Lo/cals really【 l\o\ve this 【】unicorn and pla【nt pretty fl【owers on】 the roun\【dabout on which it&rs】quo;s l/ocate\d. I eve【n think that\ one year it won the country&rsq】uo/;s 'Prettiest Roundab\out' award!/""Rainbow Unico【r\n""\I find i/t ve\ry im\portant to improve the visual 】culture of kids so】 that the coming generations kno】\w/ how 】to app】reciate and preserve beauty】. Th【e Hungar】ian town of Érd commis\sioned /\me to bring【 life to local k\ind\ergarten building/s and I d【ecided to get t【he\ ch】ildren in】volv/ed【 by encouraging them to take part in the brainstorm【/in/g process. I 【as】ked them questions like\ what they dreamt of, what th【eir f/avorite】 animals were, et/c. and together we create\d friend】ly animals all around\ the kindergarte】ns./"The Kinder/gart】e】n Project/Eva Szombat"In general, I beli【eve the sculptures in pub/li【c spaces affect 】p/eople&rsqu【o;s l/【ives no matte/r wher【e they are. And 【】as【 for【 【my wo/r/ks, they a\re a【lways\ exactly】 whe【re \they ne】ed to 【be and t/hey always somehow refle/ct and connect to/ the place they are in."Ho/w, in your opinion, does art he】lp】 raise awareness about impor/ta\n\t\ issues\ like a】nimal welfare an/d climate/ ch】a\nge?"In t【erms /of PR and communications, you can do a lot of messagin】g. 【I/ cre】ated a rhino sculp/】ture 【\for the Budapest Zoo in 2013 and it’s a re【curring th\】eme for me. Every ye】ar\ I p/ost a ph】oto of it an/d rem】ind my\ fol】\low\ers/ that this year there are a lot/ fewe】r of t】hem l/ef【t in the wild than the year b/efore." 【View this post on I\nstagra/mVisitin/g Sanyika【 a【t th【e Bartha Factory ?/?@tomi.bartha #【Sa\nyika #Sa】nyib&aacut】e;csi #rhino #rhino/ceros #wild\life #be/echwood #\【sculpt】ure #bigb/oy #gabormiklosszoke #габ【086; 】88;l【4;&【#【1080;клошсё 】82;еA post shared by Gabor Miklos Szoke,\ Artist (@gabo【rmszoke) on Mar 3, 【2016 at 1:20】pm P\ST\"I try to stick /to the animal t】heme /not \only【 be/cause they&rsqu】o;re a cool s【hape【 but because there’s an【 underlying message/ I /【usually want to get across with eac】h work. Because t【he】y are mostly/ on display in public 【】spaces it helps reac/h al/l ag【e grou】ps and social backgrou/nd【s and \ref】lect on the role an】imals pla/y in our lives."Share this article More\ 【from l/ife4rXb

yklZIn Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\f9oc

e9anRed Sea corals flourish at previously-restricte【d Israeli beachqoTu

iyw4Te/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 stylehKIn

1.PATt“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Tide turns f/or an Italian coas\tal wa/steland【/ 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsRQvp

2.a7pgGood c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rulesg3ik

3.djyuA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewxrF5

4.FbaNCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?LIbA

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