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老虎机游戏2020年06月02日03时17分18秒

时间:2020-06-02 03:17:19 作者:千千音乐 浏览量:28136

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】ERgA IZoxsg7KYou and I 】/mig【ht not【 see a goldmine/ i\n the sewag/e water【 from the city of Brussels, but a tea\m of scienti【sts are hunting for gold and silver here."Al/l the sewage of the city arr】i】ves here and /in th【e/ treatmen/t \process, the】/y 【clean up the water whi【ch i/s disposed to the river b\ack. And all t】he so\lid mater\ia【l which con\tai/ns also a/【ll the/\ metals】 is c\once/ntrated 【in t】\【he slud】ge," explain\s \Dr N\atacha Brion -】 】VUB Scie【ntist.D\r Natacha Brion is c】ollecting sa】mpl\es at a number of sewage s【ites around Brussels/.T】hey're 6 mo】nths into a】 /3 year project. Hunti/ng for tiny nano-par/ticles of gold and silver not visib】le to the naked eye - at /ea/ch stage】 wh/ile/ the sewag\e is processed.Their init【ial findings are that the dried out dark \brown dust cal\led slidge i\s the richest.Th\e material f\alls into the co\n】taine/r, th/is is th【e sludge, th/e mat\erial /that N【atacha and her team ar【e /interested in. It/\ smells\ disgusting.Back in t\he lab w【here three uni】v】ersitie\s ar\e c】ollabo】ra】ting on this pro【ject - they】're working out how to extract 】t\he preci【】ous metal/s."We w】/oul【d like to use nano-materials/ and i【ron oxide【/ nano-particle【s which are magnetic t【o be able to collect se\parately \these 【different ions in 】solutions,"】 Professor Gill】es Bruylan【ts - UL/【/B Scientist.Their initial tests find th\ere's 】aroun/d 1 gram of gold and 5 grams o/f sil/v\er per to/n of\ sludge.They bel/ieve sports\ 】clot【hing or perhaps jewellery during washing and ce】rtain/ medicines are w\here the\ nanop/ar/ticles of gold and silver are】/ coming fro/m."Their】 resour\ce \i/s almost【/ exhau【sted so yo/u【/ don't fi//nd them easily anymore in nature. And/ so now many scientists are t\rying to find al/l poss\ible 【ways o\f recyc\ling these,/" says B【rio【n.And the whole thing i\s also【 about opti/mising sewage proces】sing so treate】d wate/r enter【in【g rivers】 like【 thi\s remains uncontaminated.Shar\e this articleCopy/pa\ste the article video emb【ed link below:Cop【yShar】eTweetSharesendShar/eTwe\etSharesen\dMo【reHi/deShare/SendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou mig【ht also like / / 【 【 】Meet the researcher【s us\in\g se【a tu【rtles 】to learn more about cyclones / 】 \ \ 【 \ European p\【roject Best【Med/Grape i/s /helping winegrow\ers 【transform g/rap】e】 w\aste into cos/metic products 】 / Degraded land begi【ns to bloom thank\s to European compo】【sting project \ \ More a/bo\utResearch】 & DevelopmentResearch\Enviro】nmenta【l prote\ction 【 \Br/owse【 【tod/ay�】39【;s tags98UL

mdbzHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eaterQ2Ly

uNSXEU&#/039;s youngest commissioner\ on\ how to turn【 clim【ate cri【sis arou】nd34XhweHe

dW1wMilk-】made fashion from】【 Tu】sca【nycZgC

7bxJC】o【uld seaweed be th【e fuel of the/ future/?ezjV

SVumHow can we b/alance urbanisatio】n with protec【/ting the en】vironment and qua/l\ity of life?Jnkm

Soybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020

HiudCoronavirus/ latest: Donald【 Trump halts/ U/S payments to World Health /Organiz【a\ti】o】nmciq

Y9DbMore preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tags9KDg

LbQQMore than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ group0aLs

Vg5FLisbon k【icks-off year as\ Europ/ean Green Capital 2020tFSa

NmeaText sizeA/a】AaIt tur【n\s out, the Duke of S【us\sex/ is/ an amazin\g phot\ogr】ap\her. And he ch\ose Eart/h D/ay to】 give a proof of that, as【 h【e posted 8 of his s/tunning 【images about natu/re on Inst【agram, in ord【/er to sh【are his environm/ental 【point of view. "Today is #earthday - 【an】 opportun】ity to learn ab/out, celebrate】 【and continue】 to safegua\rd our planet/, our 】home【," the caption reads. Fro】m critically【\ 【en\dang】e/red /species to【】 \plas/tic】 pollution,\ /the selection provide【s\ an ove【rview of today's most pressing en】v/ironme【ntal issu【es./Prince】 Harry's comm\itmen/t to protecting/ \the env\ironment is alrea】dy widely known. The Duke and Duchess of Sus/s\ex even used their own wedding day as an action ag\ai\n/st ocean pollution by as】king wel\l-wis【hers to support cer\t/ain\ cha【rities instead of offering gifts. In the me【antime, Meghan, Duchess of S【ussex ha/s already【\ /been recogniz【ed f/or her 【ethical fashion choices. The /ro】yal household is also com/mitte【d t【o reducing its en\vironmental impact\, amon\g othe\r measures, the Buckingham Palace has anno】unced 】some change/s last\ year】, such as cu\tti】ng back on【 the use of plast\ics, in ord\er】 to figh】t agai/【nst 】plasti】c pollution.Click on the【 video above to/ see the /ph【oto\s ta/ken by Prin】ce Harry.S\hare this article \ More from【 lifeomrn

MUovThe ef\fort to end pla\stic pol/lu】tion in our oceans was /one of the【 /【key th】【emes of 2018, \wi【th Europea\n【 Un【io\n lawma【kers \ending the ye【ar with an \agr【eement to ban【 certai】n single-use 【plas】tics by 2021.Mic【r】opla/stics c】an 】affe】ct microscopic animals' ability to feed and the【】】ir ability to repro/\】duc【e Dr Matt /Cole 【/ Marine Plas【tics/ Re】search Scientist,】 Plymouth M\arin/e Laborato/r【y /Be/l】gian 】MEP Fr&eacu/te;d&eacut】e;\rique【 【Ries 【is behind the law, and t】【old Euron【ews: "Th/e balloon \sticks, the stirrers, the cotton buds, the straws, the 】plates are going to be b【anned】. And 】why \are \they going to be banned?【 Beca【u】【se t【he【y \a【re the /a\rticles that you mostly f\/ind on our beaches, /and/ on/\ our oceans, and becaus【e 【there are alternatives."A【 central issue in the single-use plastic ban is who is going to pay. The new European di/rective means fishin/g ge\ar \manufacturers will/ be】ar the cost\s of collecting ne/ts lost at】 sea, rather than the f/is/hermen.】The 】s【ame k【ind of principle is【 \being 】applied to the tobacc/o \industry and its \plast\【ic\ cigarette ends.However industry body Pla】sti\csEurop【e argues the responsibility/ should be sh】ared more widely.Executi/v\e Direc】\tor Karl Foerster explained\ th【eir posit】ion to Eur【one/w/s【: "We make the raw material, so that's our responsibili/ty, t/hen you have somebody t【hat makes /the product, then you have the c【onsum【er b/rands/ that p\】ackage any food in it, t【he people consume 【it and b\uy it \in a re/tailer, so you see t【he\re a\re many 】play【ers that are invo/lved i/n the life-cycl】e of a product\."An estimated 8 million tonnes of 【p】/last\ic waste end【s up in \th】e\】】 oce/ans every year. 】The EU's ban is【【 significant in terms o\f s】/etti\ng a policy precedent, /but it won't \change\ the seas ver【y 】much, as/ 90% of the p\la】s/tic pollution is【 believed to com/e from 10 rive【rs - 8 in As/ia, /and \two in Africa."The plastics become micro\plastics in \the oceans and ar\e eaten by marine animals. 【Dr Ma】tt Cole, a Marine Pla】stics R/es\earch Scie\nti\st at P\lym】outh\/ M\ar\ine Labo\ratory, tol【d \Euronews that all【 creatures gr【eat and small are affected. "What we've been able to identify (is) t\hat in very small plankt/onic microsco/pic animals, that the microplastics can/ effect their ability t\o feed,/ their a【bil/ity to\ re/produc【e and also their sur/vival," he 【says. "Other \researchers have d/one th\e same/ kind of work on oys】ters, mus\cles and fish, and also 】shown vario/us negati/ve impacts that th】ese plastics ca/n have on】 these animals."Along【【side】 the sin【gl/e【-use plast/ic【s// ban there are other\ e【fforts being made to sol【ve the p/roblem.This ye【ar/ The Ocea/n 】Cleanu/p deployed thei\r first system aime\d at catching large\r plastic【 w\a】ste in the Pacific for recycl/ing.Jou\rnalist name • Jeremy WilksShare this articleCopy/【paste the article \video embed link below:Cop【yShar/eT】weetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMore/H】i\deS】hareSendSh/areShareSh】areSendS】hareShar【\】eYou might also】 like 【 /】 \ 】 \ 【 I【ta【lian ban【 o/n plastic cotton 】buds 【comes into ef/fect 【 】 \ 】 】 / \ 【 【 Scotland bans si\ngl【e-us\e coffee cups in gov【ern【ment buildings【 】 / 】 \ Greenpeace: Single-use pl/astic\ h【as to stop 【 \ More aboutEco/l\ogyEnvironmental protectionPollutionEuropean politicsplastic【 Browse today's ta【gsER20

TsqtHow to become a 【】more sustain\able\ me【at eaterscCo

ihU1Text si【zeAaA\aHaving cricket tacos or fried Man\churia/n scorpi/ons on the menu of your favourit【e organic and susta【in【able resta\/【urant ha/s a pr】etty good 】chan【ce in 】the futu【re.【 E【dible insects are on/ the/ r\i】se, t【hey are becomin】g more and more popular f【or nu【tri】tion】a】l/ reasons\ and f/or environmen/tal b/enefits./\According to a r】e/port of Global Market Insights,【 the global edible\ i【ns】ects market s/\ize is /expect】ed to grow f/r【om o/ve【r $】55 mi【llion in 27 to】 over 0 million by 2024.In 】the We【stern part of the】 wo】rld, the gastronomic argument is on the go wh】ile many】 hig】h-e】n】d r】estaurants joine】d it alr\eady, such as the multiple winner of the Wo】rld’s B【est Restaurant, Noma】 in Copenhagen, which h】ad become widel】y kno/wn for its efforts to make】】 in【sects as an acc】eptable food】 fo【r th\e futu\re. Another temple of hi【gh-en/d g】astronomy, S&atil】de;o Paulo&rsqu/o;s D.O.M., ranked the ninth best re/staurant in】 the】 】world】, made headlines a fe/w years ago by s】erving a r\aw/ Amazo\nian leaf-c/utter ant on a pi\\neapple cube.In an era in which】 concern o\ver the world'【s climate only c\ontinues to grow deep【er/, experts 】are re】g【ularly encouraging extreme and pe】rhaps even creative action. Hence advocates of/ edible in/sects ar\e singing the/ en/vironmental】 benefits of s\prinkli【ng your di】she【s 】【with crickets, grasshopp\ers and ant【s】.B】ugs p【ack a lot of protein and minerals but take 【far f\/ewer reso】urces /to produce than animal meat/.Click on the vi\deo above 】to learn more abou\t 】the\ high-end ins】ect dishes 【serv/ed in New York City/.S】ha】r\e\ this 】\article / \ More from wellnessNM2A

Y7BnFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net widerJS06

MES1Push to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers6uS0

DiKWGerm【an Chancellor/ An\【ge【la Merkel said she wants \her/ country to aim】 to neutralise gas \emissions by 2050, so as to be C】O2 neutral, but this has to be r【e/alistic.Mrs M【erkel spok/e a\t the Pe】tersberg C/limate Di/al【ogue co/nference on cli【mate change /tha/t t/ook p【lace in Berlin, and noted 【that she 【understands the desire to\ pr\ot\ect the\ environment."】/There are chi\ldren a/nd you】ng people\ around the /\world who d\emonstrate ev【ery 】【week so th】at\ th/ey 】can push for】 the prot】ectio【n \of the envir【onmen【t. They are pushing \all the politicia】n】s worldwide. To be hon】est, this is \n】ot /at all pl/easant, but\ I wa\n【t t】o\ stress that i【t is】 absol【ute/ly und/erstanda\ble," the German Chan/cellor sa【id. At the same time that global leaders and internat【【ional players d/iscussed the environment, G【reenpe\ace ac\t/ivists s【taged/ a protest at \the B】randenburg Gate,/ ca【lling f】or immedia】te measu/res."We mu/st take the right deci【sions for our future now, that's why we're here. T/o s/end a /clear message for a last chance as\ ti\me is running out," said Robin Miller.Ang\ela Merkel stressed that 】we【alth\y \countries that pollute the en/vironment more have the greatest responsibility t】o face up t/o clim/【ate change immediately.\Share t/h】【/is articl【e【Copy/past】e the \article video embed\ link be】low:Co\】py\Share【TweetSharesendShareTweetShares\endMore【HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also lik】e 【 【】 】\ / 】 / Climate chan】ge: Responses to Merkel's\ vow【 to 】neutralise German'】;【s CO2 ar\e ambivalent 】 】 Carbon dioxide hits a level not】 】seen for 3 million 【y】ears. He】re&#Small】, independent fisheries are slo\w/l【y making 】their return after almost being wiped 【out by Denma【rk【's d\ecisio】n to privati\se f\ishing 【qu】\【otas a 【de\cade a/go【, whi/ch allowed big companies to assert their d】ominance in/ t】he f/ishing market.The\ EU\&rsqu/o\;s Common \Fish\eries Policy le】ave\s it up to member states to decide how to allocate i\t//s n【】ational fi】shing qu/ota 】to\ its fishing fle\et.With market prices】 skyr\ocketing】, small fis】heries 】were pushed to sell the/ir \boats and leave the 【trade.So/me fishe\rmen say】【 the beam t\r\awl/ers also】】 had a de】t/rim【ental 【environmental impact b】y\ damaging seabeds.】W\orking /to】/getherF\ish【ermen in the North W/estern town of Thorups】trand decided it was time to take actio【n 【to /ensure their to/wn】, an/d oth【er /fishing vil】lage\s weren't wiped【 off the map by the quota sys\】tem.Cooperatives were es/ta】\blis\hed to all【ow fishermen to band t】ogether, bu/y\ and share quotas【 am\ongst t/he\mselves】.T/h】is also ensured traditional boat making, a D\anish i\con /】sin【ce the Viki】\ng【 ti】mes, has been able 【t】o thrive\ on【ce mo/re.The European\ Union has also seen the potential in this\, partially fun\ding a boatyard to build vessels and t】rain n/ew craftsmen, in turn\ cr\】e【ating local opportunities f\or ele\ctricians an\d engi/neers, as well as an 【attr【action for tourists.S】mall sc\ale fishin/g【 in Eur\opeThe European Union recog【nises the i【mp】ortance of small 】scale/ fi】she/【【ries \acr\oss the con/tinent, invest/ing an es】timated 212.4 million Eu】ros (the /estimated total\ p\ublic budget】 target【ed on small\ scal【e】 fisheries, EMF】F) into various projects ov】er 】20】14-2020.In the Me【diterranean and Black Sea /regions, small s\cale fisheries repres【ent over 80% of t/\he】 t【o/tal fishing fleet a】nd】 employ over 60% of t【he to【ta/【l workforce within the sector.\Cat\ch of【 the dayWith sustainable sea\fo】o【d a gro/wing food t/rend, Thorups【tran\d 【/has set up shop in one of the world's cul/in/ary capit\als.The】 town has entered th】e lucrative Copenhagen market,】 selli【ng fresh fis/h on a】 co\n\verted【】 boat in the heart of the city centre\.Ch【ef Simon Biggas M&o【slash\;【lle【r say\s\ /he hopes Thorupstrand will help to inspire ot\her to【wn\s to 【follow 【suit and】 embrace sust【a【inable f/is】h【ing coop/e】ratives.12 】 【 OCEAN EP5 - Smal【【l scale fishe\ri】es / \ / 【 】 12 / \ 【 / / 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fisher】ies 】 / 】 1【2 】】 / 【 OCEAN EP5 - S【mall s【cale fisheries \ 【 / 【 12 】 【 \ / OCEAN \/EP5 - Smal/l scale f\isheries 【 / \】12 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fish\er/ies 】 】 【 【 / 12 \ 】 】 【 \ 【 / OCEAN EP/5 - Small scale //fisheries 】 / 】/ / \ 12 【【 / 】【 【/ /\ 】 】 OC【EAN EP5 - Small s【cale【 fish/eries \ 【 【【 / 】 12 【 OCEAN EP5 - Sm/all 】scal\e/ fisheries 】 12 / \ 】 / \ / \ OCEAN 【E/P5 - Small scale /fisheries \ \ 】 \ / 】\ Journalist na\me • Denis 】Loct/ierVi\deo ed【itor • Je【an-Christophe Marca】】udShare/ this a】rticleCopy/paste the article video em】bed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendSh/a【r】eTweetShares/endMoreH/ideShareSendShare】ShareSha/reSendShareSh\are】You might also like 【【 / / / Acti】vists 】are raising \funds to save Da【ni【sh woo】den boats \ More /】aboutF\isheryEnvironmen/tal pr【otec【ti】onDenmark 【 Most viewed / / What influence o【n climate is the coronavirus 【lockdown\ r/eally\ havin/g? 【 Th【e new AI system sa\feguardin】\g premature babies fro】m infection / \ 】 Messen】ger RNA: the molecule th/at/ may【 teach o】ur bo/d】\ies to bea\t cance\r / 】 【 】 \ \ / \ \Apple/ and Google sa【y they/'ll w//ork together to trace spread of coronavirus /via smartphones\ 【 】 【 】 】 How EU fund\in/g is changin【g the face of L【atvi】an innovation Browse t】oday's tags【39;s what that/ \me//ans for 【\climate c】hange — and 【humanity【. \ 【 【 】 【 Eight EU countries /【call for more ambitious strateg【y t\o tackle climat/e change / / \ \ More aboutGermany/Angela M/erkelclima】te】 【chang】e】climat/e p】rotestsEnvironme】ntal prot/\ectionGreenpeaceHot TopicLearn more\ ab【out / c】limate change /Hot TopicLearn \more about \ climate change / Br【ow【se today�】s】【 t【agslwlt

4fLrA\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sSoSR

L3e5You’ve heard of offs\ett\ing, but】 what in the w【orld is carbon ins/etting?w5cj

jUAGTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesp3gS

1.BQPMDanish fisheries take back contr】olnagH

2.gRZYCan corals i/n Jordan sa\ve ot【her reefs from g【lobal warming?fRPR

3.vTwHAl\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsyyQ8

4.t1p8We /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/agsUw06

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qivwText sizeAaAaT/he Osc\ar-winning actor and\ fi【lm produ】c/e/r is no longer just the Wol/f\ of 【Wall 【Street, or our beloved Jack from Ti/tanic, he&\【rsqu/o;s now a ful\ly-fle【【dged env\i】ronm\e】ntalist on a mission.L【eading 【the c\harge on World E\arth\ Day every year, Di【Ca/prio this year released a '/We Lo\ve 【The Earth'/ music vid【eo aiming to【 make people【 think twice about the/ w】ay 】they treat the planet. He 】a【l/so made a 【do【c】um/enta\ry【 in 2016 with Nationa/l Geographic, 'Before The Flood【', where he m【et s【cientist/s, activists and \world le【ade】rs to d【i\scuss the dange【rs of climate change.Read more | How Justin Bieber 】shut down an Ic/eland\ic /beauty sp】otBack in\ 2015, DiCaprio decided to take the plung\e and purc/】hase an island in Belize \to bui\l【d his very own eco-resort, s\et to 】be \&l】dquo;\g\rou/nd-breaking in/】 the environmental movement.&rdquo】; 【The island in /qu\estion, Blackado/re Cay【e, was sold fo\r ./75 m\il/li/on to DiCaprio and his bu\siness】 partn\【er, who h\ave/ been working ever since to\ create an eco-haven in Central America, which is //s\et /t\o open in 2020.\Where exactly is it and why has/n’t it opene\d yet?\【B】lackad\/ore Caye island is sit【uated off the coa\st of Belize\, with a diverse ecosy\s】tem/ of land and /marine【 species/【 that is recognise】d g/\lo/【bally as part【 of the ‘Mesoamerican B/iological Corrido\【r&rs/qu/o;\ region. Nea\rly 1.5 million tourist 【visit Belize each y/ear, to stay in【 beachfront cottages an\d luxur】y hotel【\s alike. But Le】/onardo DiCaprio’\s e\co-reso【rt could】 mark a】 【revolutionary change to tourism i/n t/he area, as visitors would【 come \f【o/【r a &l】dquo】\;rest【orative experie】nce” o\n th/eir s】ust\ainable stay.BelizeGetty ImagesAlexander \HafemannThe eco-resort was supposed 【to o\pen in 2018, but the team anno/【unced that the opening was to be delayed u/ntil【\ late 2019 as it was still incomplete. This /year, it is pr\esumed that th\e/ new opening is to be in 2020】, as the pro/ject has been o/n 】hold while envi\r【o】/nmental /【studies and permi】ts have been】 /issued b\y th】e governm【e】nt of Belize.What would the eco-resort b\e like?The isl】and【 \has suffere\d from overf【ish\in\g, an er\o【din/g coastline and deforestation \of its m\angrove tree/】s for/ years. DiCaprio’s resor\【t is hoping to be the eco-\f/riendl/y /answer to 】the/ 104-acre island’【s environmental problems throug\h building ‘off-t【he-grid liv\ing h】omes’ /and a research\ station focused on climate chang/【e. It plans/ to be the &\l】squo;World’s】 fi\rst/ truly/ restorative is【la\nd/ develo】pment’.Related | An eco-f【riendly twist on【 Alexa C】hung's Glaston【bury styleWhen it 【finally opens, the e/xclusive eco-resort will /jo【in Belize【's Four S】e\asons H【otel, wh/ich is also/ due/ to open in th\e near future as a green destinat\i】on.M\ock /up of Four \Seaso\ns Hotel, Be/lizeCourtesy】// of Four Sea\sonsDiCaprio's e】co-resort will feature a h【otel, 】36 resort bungalow】s and 36 e】stat】】e villas, with details 【s】uch as ‘circadian/ l【ighting’ and solar panels 】so t】hat 】each ho】me i】s energy e】ff【icient. Outdoor a\nd indoor ex\periences will be m【erged with open-air buildings/ /surrounded by 】palm t【rees, lush, green landscap\es an】d infi\n【//ity po/ols.\Footbridge ove】r river i\n【 tranq/uil fore/st in BelizeGetty ImagesTim He】sterWith un/rivalled sunset views, Blackadore Caye is 【being described a】s t/he Maldi\】ves of Central A【merica.W】hat d\oes Leonardo 【DiCapri】o have to say?Di\Caprio is an avid scu】ba diver. In fact, it was【/】 his/ f【irst trip /to Beli【z\e 【\to swim【 in】 its barrier reef i】n 2005【】 \that sparked the ac\tor&\r/squo;s love\ of th\e islan\d.In an interview【 wi】th The New Y】ork Ti【mes, Leonardo DiCapr/io said/ about the eco-resort:“The \m\ain focus is to do\ \something that wi\ll cha/nge the world. I couldn&rs【quo;t have gone】 to Belize and built on an \isl】and an【/d don】e something 】like t】his, i\f it weren’t for the【【 ide/a \that it \could be groun\/】【d】-break\ing i\n the environ\me【ntal movement.”Leonardo DiCaprioReuters&【ldquo;Wi\th】 th/【e onset o【\f clima【te chan/ge, ther【e are huge challenges, \so we want the structure to \not o\nly en\hanc/e and improve the environment, but to be a m/odel fo【【r the/ future./”Sha\re this\ arti】cle \ More from placesZkou

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ErJSB【y Lasse /GustavssonThe rich ge【t richer while the p/o/or get poo/rer, and fis】h have no voice or vot【e. This fishy business 】has to【/ sto】\p. Govern【ments cann\ot def\end private in\te】rests an/d perpetuate ine/】quality and】 】mismanagement of/ n】atura【l pub\lic resource at【 the expens【e 【of the en\】vironment, /\small-sca【l\e fishermen,】 coast【al/ communities and the 】wi/der /e\conom/y.】 / Lasse 【】Gustavsson\ Executive Director at Oceana 【 "W/e have /n/ot come here to beg the【 world leaders to care for our future. T】hey h【ave ignore\d u【\s \in the past and th\ey will ig【nore us agai【n. We ha【ve c\o/【me he】re to let them know that change【 is comin/g whethe\r 【they like it/ or not./" Those words were spoken /by a fifteen year o/l【d Swedis【\h】 climate activist Greta T/hunberg, addres\sing】 the partic/ipants of the UN co】n【ference \COP24 i】n Katowice【, Poland】. A child/ points【 \to politicians s】aying that the em/peror has no cl【othes. Bu【t they show no shame o【r】 emba\rrassmen】t/ and keep leading/ us /】astray. The world 【is on fire. We live in times of unprecedented envi】ronmental crisis, the【 “Anthropocene&rdqu【o; ep】oc\h, where h/uman】i/t】y’s destructive impact i\s undeniab【le. H\umans /e【xcessively b/\urn fossil //fuels,\ cause deforest//at【ion, de【struction of ecosystems\, loss of biodiversity and s【pe/c】ies 】extinct】ion. We ha】ve p\o【lluted our【 o/ceans /with\ plastics and\ overexp【loi【ted their【 natural abun\da【nce.【Climate【 change i/s a global challe【ng【e and one of the biggest threa】ts to humanit\【y. COP24 is likely\ to 【fail d】ue to a lack of politic\al will to act and shocking sho】rt-term 【ex\pedience; the road t/o mea/n】ingful cha\nge is very long and bu/mpy. However, there is 】hope in】 【other quick\-/win decision】s to be tak【en which directly impact 【the envi\ron\ment and can b】rin\g immediate results.One such/ opportunity is the A\griculture and 】Fisheries Council taking【 place on】/ 17-18 De【cember in Brussels. European fishe\ries minis/ters will 】decide on annual catch quot/as for the Atl\antic /and Nort】h Sea; \t】hat【 is to say, how mu/ch f/ish ca/n be saf/ely ta/ken out of/ sea wi/thout compromising th\e st】o【ck&/r\squo;s recovery cyc/l【e.\ Fish is the perfect protei】n and \if pr【operly managed, can be a self-ren】ewing natural source of food which \contributes t/o our eco/nom/i/es.E\U l\aw req\uires that management be ba/sed /on scien【ce&m\das【h;biologic/al models assess t】he condition 】of stocks and advise on next year&rsq/uo;s 【catch limits.】 However, the reality is diff\erent due to petty politics. December’s Council is /an earl】y Christmas gi【ft//\ for usually /lo】w-key fi/she【ries mi/nisters and /an opportunity for/ them to shine【 in the media 】and boast】\ 】abou/t how much fish they n\egotiated in Br\】ussels. 【They pa/y lip service to sustai】nabili\ty while the deals they re】ach in t\his annua\l【 h】orse-t【rading】 ritual often overshoot scientific advice a/s】 t【hey co】ntinue to set catch limits too high.Thi\s C】ouncil is special; it is 【the/ last\ on】e for【 En\v】iron】ment an\d 】Fishe/rie/s /Commissio【ner Karmenu Vel/la, who\se term is comi】ng to an \end.】 The decision made will be h/is swan【 song and a last 【/ch/ance to lead the reluc\tant member states back on track with their own legally-binding com\mitment/【】s. C【ommissioner Ve/lla’】s heritage is less flamboya【nt than th/at of his predecess【or, Maria Damanki, who initiated t【he Common Fisherie】s Policy’s reform (【CFP) whi/ch\ resu【lted in】 a】n ambitiou】s EU law with a clear objective: to stop ov/erfish】ing by 2020\.Vel/l/\a’s job was the techni【cal implementation the【reof./ Re\c\overy of the iconic blue\fi】n t【una, hailed as a s\uccess sto】/ry】【, wa\s recently marred【 by 【scandal and a Europo【l criminal investig\ation in Malta, Spain an\d】 /Italy, 】resulting\ in 【t\he sei\zure of over 80 tons of illegal fish 】wor\th over &euro\;12 mi】llion and\ th】e arrest of 76/ people. \The Mediterranean Sea 【is in crisis, with an【 o】verf】【ishing ra/te of over 90% of\ 】a】ssessed stocks. Ho/wever, Atlant/ic and North Sea EU fish】eries - overexploited by 40% - s\till 】stand a chance to del【【iver by the\ leg\al deadline o/f 2020.T【here】 has never/ /bee\n \a bet【te】r】 moment to【 switch to fully sustain】able】 fisher【ies. EU fleets/ alr\eady make record/ high net pr/ofits compared to\ oth【【er ind/ustrie/s due to low f】uel price】s and improved produ【ctivity of/ cert\ain stocks. Th【e/y can afford/ a short-term, necess/ary】 reduction in【 quotas for the sake of longer-term gains. Healthy fisheries yield \impressive returns\, and\ sustainabilit//y p/rovides long te\rm pr\ofitability.In 【contrast, overfis\hing is against common sense, the \law, t/he e【nvironment and the ec\ono】my; it costs us jobs, food, and/\ 】m【one】y. 】O/ceana&【rsquo】;s】 ex【tensive research and country case stud【ies ha/ve s【howed【 how sustainable fishing/ /based on science can further con/tr】ibute to the EU economy:】 60% mo\re fish landings 】(2 m】illion to/\nn/es), EU GDP inc\rease of &e】/uro;4.9 billion, 】and 92,000 new jo\bs【. Thos/e are enor/mous social\-econom/ic 【gains w】hich are har/d to ignore.And yet fisheries minist【ers are dea】f t\o this st/rong argument. Their irration】al behav】iou\r can on/ly be explained by 【a lack of coura【ge, sh】\ort-term think/ing an/d catering to【 particular fisheries lobbies. Recent scandals in the /UK【 and \Denma\/rk \conf】irm 【tha【t 】“codf/athers&r【d】quo; h/a\ve 】mor\e in【fl/ue【nce than scientist】s o【n ministers\, who a\/ct like the proverbial fox guardin【g】 the henhouse.It is no coincidence 【that the worst offenders in terms\】 of bein\g cham/pions of overfishing /are the\ fisher\ie【s min\isters as \th【ey ignore scientific advice and/ cosy up to \the fi/【shing companies. Five wealthy UK families c【oncentrate power over more than a quarter of the country&rsquo【;s】 【【fishing quota, disc/rim【inati/ng against smaller-sca【le fi\shermen./ Simil/\a【rly in Denmark - where the fisheries 【minister was fo/rced to leave his job du【e to his 】coddling of the industry&rsquo/;s “/big fish” - the lion’s share 【of catches still remain i【n【 the han【/ds of a/ fe【w &ldq】uo;qu\o】ta\ \kings&r\dquo/\;.】The rich get richer w/\hile the \poor get poo/rer, and fish have no voice\ or vo】te. 【This fishy b\usine\ss【 has to s】top. Governments\ c/annot defend priv/ate interests and perpetuate \/inequal】ity and \mismanag/em\ent of\】 natural publ/ic reso【u\rce at the e】xpense 】\of the enviro/nmen\t【, small-sca/le fishermen, 】\coasta】l co【mmu/nities and the【 wi/der economy.NGOs and soc【iety will not beg nat【ional m/ini\s【te】rs and EU insti【tutions to c】【are for our【 planet, sustainabili/ty of our/\ natural resources, and our com\【m\on fu】\ture - it \is t\heir res】】p】onsibility. Ch/an【ge will com/e\/ eventually/, and po/l【iticians will be the【 firs\t on/】es to go. Liv】e up to y/our respons】ibilites and do the righ/\t 】thin【g: you are not onl【y po/liticians but also decision-takers and lawmake】rs. Your horizo【n\ should be the】 【good o/f future gener【a【\tions, not t/he 【next el】ection and the private【 sector’s favours. You have the/ power t【o #【/StopOverfishing.\ Bring back our /fish\ 【now!【L/asse G】ustavsson is the】 Executive Direc【tor /of Oceana in EuropeOpinio/ns【 expressed in Vie\w 【art/icles ar\e so\lely thos【e of the author.Sha/re this articleShareTweetSharese\ndShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS\hareSe/ndShare】Share\【Share/SendShareShareYo/u might/ also like / Scallo/p【】 wars: French and】 Bri/tish fi\shermen pledge talks to solve spat 【 】 \ 【 / Senegal's fishermen say /】European overfishi】ng is】 crippling 】them / 】 / / / 】Coronavirus latest: Donald Trump halts /US paymen】t【s to World Healt/h \Organi【zation / 】 More aboutEurop】ean \UnionEuropean po【l\iticsOpinionfis/hingfish industryEnvironmental protection 【 Br】owse 】today&#【039;【s tags7ctO

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UXoUA fish\y】 b/usiness: EU poli\ticians are risking o】ur fu【t【ure by 】gambling on our nat】】ural resource/s | ViewPqni

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RTt2Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000Text si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom life twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ife0zch

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PpklTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placeswpf5

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YikSThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagspICD

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