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星力移动电玩城2020年06月02日08时55分52秒

时间:2020-06-02 08:55:54 作者:汽车大全 浏览量:31489

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】小说阅读 ztz8kgSWItalian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effect5tjI

5PS2More preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tagsqDwz

ez3JOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagswhTHX1ww

LLVWText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,5Watch: British sculptor cre\ates a【 /marine e【xhibition\ in Tuscany\ we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yleSOSx

hbgDT/ake a\】 l【ook 】at】【 the plastics o/f the f/utureRYfh

C26HWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】steRa0o

Text si】zeA】【aAaCan a univ\ersity&r【squo;s campus building promote【】\ sustainabi】lity and care \for the environment while also bei【n】g an architect\ur】al】】 marvel? /Budapest/’s Central Eur】opean U\ni\versity (\】C\E【U)【 proves that the l/ec/ture hall\s in which we /study ref】lect ou/r【 acknowledgement of the【 seriousness of climate change, p【/ut \us on a path towards alle\viating carb/on emissions and wast【e, and enrich 】our concept of aesthetic bea【\u】ty.I【/n July, 2015 CEU【 became【 the second highe【r educatio\n insti【tution in contin【enta/l Eur【ope, and the first \in Central and Easter】n Europe, to receive the BRE【EAM 【(Bu【ilding 】Research Establ【ish】ment Environmental As【sessme\nt Method) certificatio【n, th/e world's le】ading design a/nd /a】ssessment method for sustainable buil\di\ng】s.Two 】of【 \the【 campus&//rsquo; buildings – the Nador 15 a】n】d\ the Nador 13 &n\dash; have been BREEA/M certified. 】In\ 20//1【7, th】ese bui/ldings won the CEU \/the Env】ironmental S【ocial an\d Sust\ainability 【A\ward, part of the CIJ Awar/ds Hun【gary competition spons】ored 【by CIJ, Europe’s 】l\//ea【ding【 Real Estate digital and pri/nt news provi【d】er.The n【】ew and 】imp】roved/ bu【il\dings boast features s】/uch as micro-shading, high f/requency lighti】\ng a//nd n/atural li\ght, cover】ed /courty/ards, preserved b\rick work /a/s cons\truction mater\ial, bio\diversity an/d open\ air spaces on camp】us and motion, air quality and temperatu\re data collection with build\ing management software, among o【the/rs.Insi\de the N15 buildi\ngCEU/Daniel VegelCEU's ro\oftop gardenC/EU/Da】niel VegelWe】 too【k a tour】 o/f t】he stunning N13 and 【N15 bu\ildings with Tamara Steger (Associ】ate Pr】ofessor in CEU’s】 Environmental Sciences】】 Department\【 and the Chair of 】the /Su【sta】inability Committee a】t \the time)\ and Loga【n Strencho】】ck (CEU’s/ MSc En】viron\mental Scie【nces【, /Poli【cy and Management a/】lumnus 【and cu【rrent Enviro】nmental and Su//stainability Officer), both of whom were inv【olved in t\he project from \day one.Why B\REEAM?/Logan: “We could have【【 chosen from a few 】different susta/inabilit】】y【 stan】d】a【rds such as LEE\D, the/ Danish b】uildi】ng codes or t【he /German Energ\y Conservation Regulation】s but we】/ dec/i】d】【ed to 】pur【\sue BREEA【M b/ecause we】 a/re in a】n u】rban campus 【[CEU’s campus is【 in the heart 】of historic Pest】] and we have a mix of old\ and new buildings, so 【that was the mos【t suitable for us.&rdq】uo; View this\ po/st on Instagram/Dear n\ew CEU /Class, welcome to 【#【Budapest! Thi/s what th】e #walktoschool will lo\ok like f/or many of you. Hope you'll enjoy your time with us! #WelcometoCEUA p】ost \shar/ed b/y Cent【ra/l European Univer【si/ty 】(@ceuhungary) on Se】p 3, 2018 at 4:21am PDTCEU in\ historic PestTamara: &l\dquo;While there was in】terest in support【ing green building fea\tu】res\, BR【EEAM certi【fication\ 】was/ not a given at first. C/EU considered th\e eviden【ce and 【was convinced of the i】mportance 【and value of h/aving ce\rtific】ation/\ 】to reflect t】he rigor【\ i//n its commitment to sustainability /a】nd its prom\inent 】r】ole\/】 in academic excel】/【lence as well./ T\he\ certif/ication was also an importa】n\t ga】uge that co】uld assure the edu/cational, environmental and econ\】omi/\c benefi\ts based/ on specif/ic and reputable\ standar\ds 【and criteria. By \pursuing BREEAM, the\ administration】 saw the opp\ortunities to 【【save money, demons/【trate furthe】r /their/ commitment to sustainabilit】y, and eve】ntually take advantage of the important learn/ing opportunities manifested in\ th/】e building\s' des【ign a/nd operations】.&rdquo\;Th/e path to /BRE】EAMLogan: &ldquo/;In\ 2009, the university signed a 【susta/inable development p\olicy bu【t without the tools to do anything, i【t was mostl/y a nicely worded do\cum】ent. So when in 2012-2013, the univ/ersity decided to kick off a redevelopment project it was decided t【hat i】t wa【s in everyone&r\squ【】【o;s inte】rest to d\esi\gn an effic/ie/n】t building. In order 【/to achi/eve th\is, the university nee\ded a team /to work on th/i/s full/ time and so 【the S\ustainab】ility Officer position /was /created. The firs【【t item on 】my a【genda w/as to 【persuade the administra【tion t\o pursue/ BR【EEAM because i【t \【would show that】 we/’re t/aking step\s outside of ‘business as\ usu】al&r【squo; /and taking sus\tainability seriously】. We\ knew it would c【ome with a lot 【of extra costs and effort b【ut we】 w/a】n【ted to do it right.&\rdquo;Tama\ra:/ “In term/s of【 the environmental i【mpacts, the campus 【before was not【 as 】energy an【d water efficient; acc\ess to r//ecyc\ling b】ins 【and fil】tered water was limited; and the Ja【panese Garden was /not as ecologically friendly a】s the N15 rooftop. 】The redeve【l】o【/p【ment effort n】ot only drew on【 general e/nvironmental and economic con】cerns, b/ut d【emonstrated CEU's commitme】nt to sustain\abili\ty education/ as sig】nato\】ry to the Copernicus Charter and its Sustaina/ble Dev\elopment】 Po\licy.&\rdq\uo;CEU's rooftop \garde】nCE】\U/【Danie【l VegelLogan: “At t\h【e time, there were a few contrac/tors here in Budapest who were famil/iar with BRE and LEED because a few b【anks and private c\ompanies had \already b\een certif】ied in Hung】ary. But our pr】】o\ject was especiall【y【 complex b【【ecau\se we are in the heart o】f th【e 5th distr【ict【, in a historically significant build\ing and we ha//d to take/ d/own one /building entirely on【 a 【very small const】/r【uction foo】t\prin】t, all while keeping 【the university r【u】nning full 【time. \Ge】t\ting the BREEA\【M certification \takes a\ long time and requires a lot【 of \documenta】t】ion, which can get quite complicated be/cause the】 inspectio】n is \very【 rigorous a【】nd thorough &/n/dash; as】 it\ s【hould be, of c【】ourse. But/ we\ knew this whe【n we d【eci【ded to embark on th\is redev【elo【pment proj/ect.&r】dquo;The new, im\proved and BREEAM】/-certifi/ed CEU campusTamara: &】ldquo;The new\ BREEAM certified buildings reflec】t CEU's o】wn charac/ter as an i【nnovative, visi】onar/y place of learn【/ing and research wi】th concrete (l【ite【\rally and f/iguratively!) im\pact【. In addit/ion to th】e】 direct green benefits, the new campus buildi】ngs /also nurt【\ured the CEU community in 】a different way /in terms of learning and learning experiences, c【\ommunity inter】actions and teaching. The CEU community is incr】easingly aw【are/ of recycl】ing d\ue to th/e p/resence o\f recycling bins.Recognition and awards for the N13 【and N15 buildi\ngs, including/ thei【r environ/mental features, ha\ve been well publicize\d 】drawing attention to the beauty and /impor\tance of environmental 】sustainabilit】y. The bu/i【ldings reflect ou/】r acknowledgement of the seriousness o】f climate chan/g【e\ and pra【ct【i/cal steps in \the【 【/direction\ 【of alleviating c】arbon emi【ssion【s and waste.【”I\nside the N15 buildingCEU///Zolt/a\n Tub】aLogan: “W【as it \all w【orth it? 】Yes! BREEAM guided the b】uilding design and【\ the c】onstruction m\an\agement process to be comprehensive with concern for long-term functio【nality, sustainability a\nd the environm】ent.&rd\quo;Ta】mara: &l\d【quo;One/ of the \features of t【he new buildings/ that 【I really like ar【e 【the old b\ricks that were reuse\d from the previous buildi【ng. The library a\nd classro】om\s have facilitated new possibilit/ies for st/【udying/, learn【\in【g, networking and】 teaching\ such as priva】te meetin\g rooms 【in /the】 library and s】\mart b】\oard【s/ in the c【las\sr【ooms. /Since being loca/ted in N13, I run i【nto colleagues from different\ depart\ments much 【more fr/equen【tly a【nd enjoy the opportunities to catch up \on news, resea\rch oppo\rtunitie】s, et】c.【”CEU's re-used brickwor\kCEU/Zoltan Tuba】Logan:】 “\What is【 truly uni】que ab/out】 the new ca】mpus is the roof garden. I【 haven’t se【en an【y /othe\r central】ly【 【【locat/ed u\niversity building with s\uch 【a space. The way /that th\e N13 】buil\d\ing wa】s la】rg\ely preserved but reinvented/ is also an ac\/hie/vem】ent in and of itself. We\ re\used a lo\t of bri】ck-work【 from the buil\ding th/at was /t/aken down 】as opposed to 】【using fresh con/structi】on material, which 【】/has a significant en】vironment\al impact reductio【n. Arch【itecture-wise】, I find the lib/ra】ry 【【to be a real/ly n【ice space not /only for r\ead\ing【 and studying, but\ also 【f/o【r 【rela/xing \thanks t\o \the lay out and the nat\ural ligh【t that \manages to penetr\ate 【and t【he stunning city views you get from some of the li/【brary’s /windows.Wha】t I hope the redev\elopmen\/t project and th\e BREE/A】M cer【tification reall【y ac】hiev【e is teaching /】\people how to r\eally have an impact wit】h\ their research. You’re not done once the bu/ilding】 is/ built. We have an/ environme】ntal sciences department here at CEU which activ】el\y engages with environment【al so【cial\ mov\ements in Bud/ape【st, Hungary&\rsq/uo;s r】egions and the Centr/al Euro/pea\n region as a wh【ole【. I hope】 this new buil【dings further motivates th\e/ p\rofess//ors and\】 th】e\ student com\muni】ty t】o have【 a \real/ impac/t with 】their resear/ch.&r【dquo; View t【his post on InstagramSpri\/ng 】is here! Check o/ut \the Li\br】ary’s view/ onto /one of CE】U’s newly】-planted vertical gardens! It&rs/quo;s #takeoverTuesday with the #【C\EULi\/b\rary】.【 #sp/ottedatCEU #v\erticalgardening #springA pos/t shared by Central Eu】ropean Uni\versity (@ceuhun】gary) on Mar 21/, 2017 a\t 2:26a\m P/D【TCEU【\ Libr/aryAlthou【【gh at pre【\sent there is st【il【l some uncertainty 【r\eg/ar\ding CEU’s s【/tatus in Hungary due to long-running political\ tensions, \the university ret【ain\】s accreditation as a Hu】【ngarian university and will seek to c/ontinue teaching \and research activi\ty in Budapest as long as】 poss【i\ble.Share this article More/ from life

htVf"By\ d/oing good, good came【 back t】o me"/;Lr27

dx3VGood c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH ruleslvts

wzVoScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsybva

4SHvGood c/hemis/【try: helping busine】/ss to come w】ithin REACH rulesSiAa

25fnWatch back: 【Greta T\】hunber\g says /she/】9;s not nervous a/s she gets ready for America【s tripN7KQ

UoMgIt【】 sits o\ff the coast of Nor】mandy,【 l【ooking like 】a f\airytale castle flo/ating on】 the water.】But for years, the Mont/ Saint Michel ha】s lost a part of its \mysterious solitude【, due t\o an accumulation of /】silt at the island's base.The concret】e causeway\ that conn\ected the island to the ma【inla】\nd pre\/v/ented the wa\te\】r /from flowly /fre】ely aro【und its base.But, no】w 】the sit】e ha\s begun to reclaim its island-like appearance during cert/a【in high tides.\Research on the proje】c\t start\ed in 1995, an【d continued /for more than/ 10 years.】 It then took another 10 year/s to complete th\e majo/r structural/ changes.\【Mar\ie-Agnés Po\ussi/er-Winsb/ack/, Vice-Presi/dent \of Normandy Regional【 【【Council【, said: "【T/hes\e works had【 two aims. First【ly【, to make sure 】that the island/ /coul/d, once a】gain, b\e what it 【wa【s duri】ng previous 【centuries, that is, surro【】unded by the sea and not s\an【d and silt. And second】ly, 【to\ improve\ the】 way we /ma/nage touri【sm."The \main work undertak】en w】as the remov\al of the\ concr/ete causeway. I/t】 was replaced/ with a brid】ge on stilts, the/refore allowi\ng water【 】to trav【el un】derneath it. It conn\ects to an area of solid gr【/ound that becomes sub/mer\g\ed dur/ing high \tide.Th\e o//ld dam o\n the Co【u/e【snon【 w/\as al【so 【d\emol】i\s【hed, and replaced wi\th /a\ new eig/h【t-gated structure that reg【ulates the 【flow between 】the river 】and the sea, which meet in t/h】e ba/y】.Romai】n D/esgu&e】acute;e, who【】 manages the ne】w d【am, explained to E\urone/ws how it works】."The 】old dam was th\ere to limit floodi\ng 】and mar/ine \flooding. The n】ew dam obvi/ously continues to do so, bu】】t it will regen【erate t/he hydro\logi\cal curren\t in the r【iver to erode the sediment. This will【 rem【ove \the sand t【hat accumulated at the 】base of Mont S】aint M】ichel," \he said.To complete th】is facelift, the car parks at t【he/ foot of the island【 h\ave been\ remo/ved, and it can no/w only be reached by a】 free shuttle bus, horse-drawn/ c【ar【riage, or by foot.More t】han 2.5/ m】illion tourists visit the World He/ritage Site every year, but the】 new 【c【hanges m/【e】an that tou【】r】 guid】es【 have had to adap\t.H【ug】o Poulet, a /gu【ide /】【for Les C】he\min\s de la】 Baie, vis\its the bay【 several 【times a da\y with groups of tourists. He /said that \the structural ch\anges have ha/】】d\ an e【ffect on his wor【k."Since the w\orks hav】e finishe【d, the ground leve】l has drop【ped, 【the sea is moving【 faste\r and no\w 【we \have 】the Cu\esnon pa【ss【ing on 】e/a/\ch side. \We do shorter outing【s, we adapt to\ th【e sea and we manage to 】juggle】\ tha】t,"【 he 【said.The project cost a total of /&【euro;184 mi【llion. Of th】at, €85 million was funded by the Fre\nch government, and €21.5 million was financed by the EU's cohesi】on 【pol/icy,】 w\hich took charge of part of the co/nst\ruction of the dam and its hydraulics.1212121212121212Share this articleCopy/past\e the article video embed l\ink below:CopyShareTweetShare\sendShareTweetS】haresendMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareSendShareSh/areMore aboutMont-Saint-MichelEnvironmen/tal protectionTou】rismFrance【 \ 【 \Browse today/9;s tags9fzW

5vkTText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessw5UR

yBnqIs o\】cea】n acidification driving e/cos】ystems\ t/o unknown territories?JNrl

twzhA\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】sUkXO

yKVY【9;M/onster fa】tberg',\ bi【gger than the 【Tower of Pis】a, discov/【ered in D】evon /QuUv

FfpcText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessAjTZ

Lgq5Text sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000T\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellness twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeT7Hn

ThuNBy 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsssCG

c7FS“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207How can we b/alance urbanisatio】n with protec【/ting the en】vironment and qua/l\ity of life? 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsR9o7

1.E39p】9;Em【otion【s run】nin/g high&#/039; in Brexit blame g\a\meD2pz

2.85V2At the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagscCFW

3.KaJc【/Spar】kle look\s to a gre///ener futu\r\e with the op\ening of its fourth data centre in GreeceswJu

4.UynMScienti【st】s es【ti【mate that roughly 】on/e million la\n/d and\ marin【e species may】 bec【ome extinct in the foreseeab/le f\uture. Many within】 decades. What are the main【 reasons for th/e decl\ine\ of under/water ec\osystems?Thanos Dailianis, a marine\ biologist fr】om the\// HCM【R-IMBB\C /resea【rc【h instit/ute /【in【 Crete,/ exp\la/\i】ns.“Marine ecosyste】ms are threatened bo/th locally 】\an【d globally/. At the lo\cal l】【evel, the/ coastal zo】ne hosts】 a lot of 【human activities, 】/ i\mp】】o\rt\ant human activities, like 】urban【isation, like agricu\lture, industry of】 co/urse, and【 ot\her uses which cause loc【a\lise/d fo】rms of degradation, l【ike pollutio/n,/ l】et’s s\ay.""But on the other hand, we have la\rge-sca\【le ph】enomena, like global warming/, or ocea/n a\cidificat/ion, which【【 \of course jo】in toge/the】r with the local】 pre\ssures and【 cause/ sometimes uncontrolled ef【/fects【.""In Crete, 】we’/re located in t/he Eastern/ Mediterranean which】/ ri\ght now【 i/s the warmest place in the Mediterranean/ basin.\ This【, a/】lon/【gsid\e with】 the adjacency with /the S\u【ez Cana【l, makes \it】 very sus\ce】pti【ble to ch【an/g【e right now.""So what we see here is an// early w】arning o/f 】things that will probably spread/ 】towards【 the 】west】 of the Mediterranean /in the\ fo\】rthcoming\ years.""/And【 of cour\se, these t【hings also happen at the global level. Global w/armin/g is a global t/hr【eat, of course, and species coming fr【/om other parts /of \th/e world is【 a universal trend right now becaus【e of this ong/oing c/hang/e.""We are of c【ourse c/oncerned because we feel it is our duty to preserve t/his biodiversity for future generations, an/d we feel t【hat righ【/t now it/’s on the ve\rge of be】coming de\g\r\ade\d.""Nature finds its ways, and t【/his 】ri/ch/ness will/ be replaced by \another richness. /The】 problem is\ mainly for us because we ha】v【e built our 【lives \with this biodive/rsity, so the loss of t/his biodiversity 【will /ma/inly af/【】f\ect hum【【ans as a species.""T】he \service\s it provides to us,/ the food, the 】\environment; all the】 stuff that makes】 our【 life nice \t【o live.\&/rdquo;Share this art】icle\【Copy】/paste the article video\ embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShare】SendS】hareShareShareSendShareS】hareYo【u /might a\lso like 】 】 】 What’s k/illing】 our \unde【rw/ater ecosystems? 】 【 】 】 / 】 】 Uncharted wate】rs: how maps ca/n help prevent conf\lict o【v/er /marine resources 】 / 【 \ 【 【 \ \ Famil】y-run fisheries struggle as n/ew generation casts net wider 】 【 More a】boutOceanFauna and Flor【aEn\vironment/【al prot【\ectionbiodiversityGree【ce 】 Mo】st viewed \ \Wh】at influ/ence on climate i\s the corona\virus lockdown rea\lly【 having? \ 【 【 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】premature babies from infec】tion 【 Me/ssenger RNA: th【e mol【ecul/e that \may teach \our bodies to b【e/at cancer 【 \ 【 Apple and Go\ogle 【say they'll work toge/th【er to trace spr\e\ad of coronavirus\ \via smart\p\hones / How EU】 funding is changi\ng 【【the face of La\tvian innova】ti\on \ 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsX2tC

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tHbpText sizeAaAaN/ew research has em\er【ged reveali/ng that plastic recycl/i】ng ra【tes are wor】ryingly low/ in Europe.European coun】tries t【ogether recycle】 less \tha【n\ a third of the plastic/ they thr/ow away,\ say【s a new report by\ S\tatista. Th【is means the 【waste is collected and treat【ed bu】t not 】retu【rned into th】【e production syste【m. The b【iggest culp】rits are single-use pl/astic【【s and pa/ckaging, for example 】car\rier b/a\gs, drinks bottles and crisp pa】ckets.Europe/ 【produces 60 m【i【llion tons of \plastic. B】ut despite efforts 】made by th\e European\ Environm】ental Agency (EEA【】) to reduce waste l】evels on the continent, on\ly 30%/ is actually recycled. Waste management /differ\s among Europe【an c\ountries. Germany is l\eading th】e way in recycling, with only 0.1% of plasti】c packaging e【ndin\g up in landfill ev\ery year, whilst Spain lags be/hind w】ith 38.2% heading to l】andfill.Plastic waste prevention strategies 】must be amplifi】ed in all E\uro\pean countries in order t\o improve the pr【\oblem a【nd encourage 】recycling. According t/o the EEA, plastic is al【r【/eady declared a priority/ waste st/ream but \more ca】n\ be d】on】e. For example, fee\s placed on plastic carrier bags has “borne impres【sive results” b/ut c】ountries should 】“d【iversify\ the\ir implemented measures.”Plastic destroys【 ocea】【ns and even poses ris】ks to human healthW】orldwide, manufactur【e】】rs produc\e 348 million tons of p】la\stic each y/】ear, c】ompare\d to just 1.5 milli】on tons in 1950. Half 】of this 】bec/omes【 \w/aste.【 EEA estima/tes say plastic wast\e incineration】 pro【du【ces/ 400 】millio【n tons of c\arbon dioxide equivalent (】CO2e\) annua\lly,/ w【hich is huge/ly \proble【matic 【fo】r t/he \environment.The &ld】qu/】【o;mirac】le【 【material” has 【made modern life possibl【\e, as it is inexpensive\ and【 d/ur【ab\le/, but over 40/% of 】it is used just once. Once 【disp】os\ed】 of, plastic items br】eak/ down into smaller fragm【ents 【that lin】ger for c/enturies, destroying】 marine life an】d “choking \o\ur waterways.】/”Plastic b/ottles ending up in the oceanA/cc/ording to N\at/ional /Geographic, thes\e mic/ro-plastics could then make their way int/o us, via fish a【n/d】 shellfish who consume】 them,\ p【osing pot】entially \damaging risks to huma/n\ /health.&ld/quo【;Every year five million to】 14 /mi【ll/ion ton\s fl【ow/ into our o【ceans from coast】al are】as】.\ Sunligh\t, wind, waves, and hea【t【 break down th\at material \into \smal】ler bits\ that look—t\o plan\kt】【o】n, bivalv/es, fish\, a】nd\ even/ whales&mdas/h;a lot li】ke\ food.”Sha】re t\his artic】le 】/ More from life9TPU

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pP5X\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ifeRj9s

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n02SText sizeA/aAaWh/en it comes/ to cr\ime re】porting, th【e med\i【a\&rsq/u\o;s /coverage is de【cid】edly 【human-fo】cus【ed. We tend to\ see re/p【orting on illega】【l drugs an【d weapons,\ but rarely 【on the expl\oit\ation of our 】natural resources, despit\e the fa/ct t\hat it \happen/s all over the globe a\n【d is a cri/mi】nal of/fe【】nce.【 The 【pro\blem is, environmenta\l crimes/ a】r】e hard to track and hard t【o prove.Arthur Par&eac\ute; is an envir\onmental crime/ rese/archer wh\o has ma】de it his life&rsquo【;s\ aim to co/me up with solut\ions【 to ensure pe】/rpet\rators /are】【 held accountable. Having/ grown up in Cost】a Rica, he spe】nt his c【hi/ldhood immerse【d in 】n\atur\e, and afte/r a fi】rst 【career in t\echnology and in【vestigating /money【 la】\undering/, /he de【cided\ to focus on what/ he knew best &ndash【/; preven/tin】g the d【estruction of o【\ur natural world.“I 】li【ved on the b【e/ach,/ g】oing surfing a【nd hiking /ev\er\y day,&/rdquo; he says. “Mov\ing to the urban streets of 【Paris \was a shock.&rdquo【\;Alongside a team o\f environment【al \lawyers at G&】】ea/cute;os/mi【ne/ in Pa【ris,【 Par&eacu\te; works to【 ex\pos\e c/rimes such as illegal w】ildlife// t【rade, res/ource extraction and pollution. H/is technical adv\【【isors c【onduct criminal analysis and investigations us\ing economic, huma\n and cyber int】el【ligence.【 The data they share can\ then be【 u】s】ed】 in ecological s【tudies or by the 【media to increa\se public \awar【en【e\/ss.The 】map gi\vin\g a\ 【vo/i】ce to the v/oi【】ce/le/ssParé’s latest feat is a tool called the Eco Crim/e Map, which【 allo【ws 】【an【o】】nymous】 users to \/repo/rt environmental crimes from wh/er】ever th/ey are in the worl】d. I/n many /countri】e\s, fear/ of politi\cal ret】aliation【 prevents victims and witnesses from 】repor【ting c【rimes to the\ author】ities. Hence, a map w/hich tracks eco crime in 【【real ti\me cou\ld 】change the way c】orru/ption is dealt with, by dr\awi\ng 【【a【ttenti【】on to c【rimin【/al trade routes. So f\ar - 178 crimes have been sha/red.&ldqu】【o;The g】oal is 】to】 ce\ntralise data related to envir】o/nmental cr】imes,【 o【btai】n information to comp】\are op\erating modes/ with other illicit indu】/stries 】and finally, to give a secure voice/ to the【 vi】ctims and witness\es of these c【rimes wit】hout ri】sk of reprisal】s,” /Par&eac】ute;】 tells Eu】ronews Living, pointing to t\】he map bel】ow..embed-container {position: re【lative; padding-bottom: 80%; height: 0; max-】【wid/th: 100%;} .embed-container iframe, .embed-c\ontainer object, .embed-c/ontainer iframe{posi/【【】tion: a【b【s/olute【; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100/%; he】ight:】 100%;} small{posit/ion: 】ab/solute; z-index: 40; bottom: /0; margin-bottom: -/15px;}Agrandir la carteRed is 】poac】h】in/\gOrange is pollu/tionGreen is illegal ext【raction\B/\lue is an/imal\ traffick/ingYello/w is】 s】anitaryPurpl【e is illegal loggin】gIf \an on】line i/nventory exists 【at t/he】 click /of a butt【on, Par&e\acute; hopes journal/ists, NGOs an】】【d authorities can make \use of the data and ex】pose the frigh/t【ening volume of crime/s committed.Fundamentally, it is a】 t\ool designed to allow any【one 【to sha【re, testify o【r rela/】y infor\mation that affects a territor/y, pop/ulation or animal and\ plant 】species】. \T/he information is 100% enc\rypted for s【a】fety reasons.Is being able to \rep【ort th【e【 crimes/ 】en\ough?Dr. Em\anuel【a Orlando, 【lecturer in Environmen】tal 】Law at the Univers】ity o\f Su\ssex, calls the map an “interesting initiative” saying it will potentially b【e able to address one of the】 main\ pro】blems wi【th e】co crime. “M【ost of these illegal co】nducts causi【ng h\arm【 to the/ environment are often 】【not detected by police and other l【aw en\forcemen\t agenci】es.” She adds, “indeed/, th/e/s】\e i\llegal ac【/tivi/ties te/nd to affect the most vulnerable sectors of the /society,\ su【ch as 】women or \/mino/rity communities in the poorest reg/ions.】”For /Dr. O/rl】ando, w\hile providing the】 voic\【eless with the protect】i】on of【 anonymity is \“welcome and shoul\【d/ be widely /publicised," she emphasises that】 reporting is 】only the first s/t/e\p of ma】n】y.\ &ld/quo;Environmental cri】me【s【 ar】e a qui】te complex issue, particu\l【arly when this is linked to org】anised crime.”S【he conclu\des/, &ldquo//;for】 these typ/es o/【f crimes, an effective strategy needs to rely on a strong enf\orcement /sy】stem” and in】stituti】ona/l framewo】rk to pr【operly ad\dress the corrup【tion.How many/ billi】\on\s is】 the environmenta/l crime industry wor【th?Acco/rd【ing to Europo/l/, the Eur\opean Union&rsquo/;s law enforcement agency, the 【/annual 【va/lue of tran\snati【onal\ environm/ental crime】 is】 esti【mate/d t\o be worth &\e\ur\o;63 to 192 billi】on euros annu】a】lly. In fa\ct, /en【vironmenta/l crime can/ be as pro】fitable【 as i】llegal dru【g trafficking, but the sanction】s】/ are m/】uch lower, an/d it i\s hard/\er to de】tect. These fa【ctors make it highl】】y a/ttractive for or/ganised crime groups.G&】eac】u【te;osmine calls it “/t/he most l/uc【rat\ive but least repr】essed illicit】 industry i\n the world.&rdq【uo; 【Group】【s are 【known to orchest\rate fake c】ons\【e\【rvation programmes, 】for examp\le, that waste m】illions of dollars in the process.“D/on’t b】uy pets online,” Par&eacut【e;/ /wa\】rns. “Often dogs and cats are being tra】ffic】\k】ed】 il\legally】 】and/ have been【 used for animal \testing.” Th/ere is/ /e/ven a \new industry emerg/in】g called cyber poac】hing. “This is a new me\thod of smuggl/ing which/ takes place on social medi\a and marketplaces like /Ebay or Amazon, \where iv/ory a【nd rhi/no ho/rns are being sold.”\The reason thes【e crimes a/re】 too o【ften ignored comes 】down /to fear of/ “blackmail a【nd pressure.”Phot\os took on a/ mission fo】r tigers parts traffic/king in Europe. The fangs here\/ were sold /K eachArth】u/r ParéIs environme\ntal crime \the s/ame as eco/cide?All over the world, laws are in p/lace to prevent envi\ronmental c\rimes from posing thre\】ats /to our everyday lives. From the dum//pi\ng of /\hazardous waste, to overfishi【ng/ a protec/ted speci/es or ivory\ \traf/ficking.By co\ntrast, ecocid【e is all/ ab【out /creating a legal dut/y of\ care for life \on ear】th【. It is the \ca\ll for the envir\onmen】t to be given rights, much li【ke humans, and/ was borne out【 of the disregard for rising 】sea levels and global war\ming】 ar【ound the world.Th\e St】op Ecocide 】campaign w【as \steered by barrister】 Polly Higgins, who died in Apri【l 】201【【9, and has /since been/ led by environmental a【ctivist 】Jojo Meht】a and others.If legally\ implemente/d, ecocide would】 mean that any hu】man activi/ty causing extens/ive d/amage t\o ecosystem【s 【or harmin【g th】e wellbeing of a species would become a crim【inal offense. This would mak】e chi【ef 】executives【 and government ministers, who commission\ /the destruction of the natural /wor\ld, criminal/ly liable】.Thus far, it has not yet been accepted as an int【erna】tiona】l crime\ by 】the United Nations.Unlike the il】l】egal \trade in drugs and other illicit goods, &ld】quo;natural resources are finite a】nd\ cannot 【b】e replenished in a l\ab,” 】stat【es Int\erpol【. 】“As such, there is a sense o\f】 urgency to comb\at en\vironmental c】rime.”The \Eco Crime Map is curr\ently crowdfunded and in search of sponsors to \sta【y afloat. Curre】ntly, it is av】ailable in English, Spanish and French/ an/d can be separated into six categ/ories】: po\aching, illegal extr【a\ctio/n,】 sa【nitary, pollut\ion, animal trafficking and illegal logging.Share this articl/e 【 More from lifeiegJ

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ft70The world economy will suffer 】its\ wors/t year 【since】 the Great Depression of the 】1930s, The Inte/r【nati】onal \Mon】etary F\und 】has said i\n i/ts l】atest forecast.The IMF said on【 Tuesd】a【y that it e/xpec\ts the g\lobal economy to s【hrin】k 】b【y 3 percent this year. Thi】s is far w\orse than the dip of 0.1 p】er】cent in the rec/essi/on year of 】2009 after\ the \financial crash.The glo\bal economy i【s t\hen expected【 t/o rebound with a 5.8 per\c】\ent grow/th in 2021, but that outlook is【 un【certain.&l【dquo;This is an unprec/edented sh\ock. We have shutdowns of important se】ct\ors o】f th【e\ econ\omy. 】As you re/-open sectors, you start from a very lo\w base, bu\t ec【onomi\c activity【 gradually come/】s bac】k,” Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, de】puty dir【【ector of/ the IMF's research de\partment, told/ Eur/onews.The bl\eak assessment represents 【a breatht\aking downgrade by the IMF. 【In January, before the【 C\OVID-19 】outbreak /emerged as \suc【\h a grave gl\obal threat, the internat】ional lending organi/s【ation fore】cast modest growth of 3.3】 /p【【【ercent this year.Howev【er, far-re【aching measures to co【ntain the pandemic -- lockdown】s, tr\avel restriction\s】\, \busines】s shutdow】ns /and social dist\ancing -【- h【ave suddenly br】ought 】economi\c activity to a near】-standst/ill."Becau】se the economic fallout is acute in specifi/c sectors, po【licymakers will need to impl【ement substantial ta/rg【\et【ed/ fiscal, m\onetary, and f\】in【an】cial ma】rket me【as【ure【s to support affected ho【useholds and businesses domestically,"【 the IMF say】s.The IM\F say/s Europe -- the epicentre of the/ pandemic -- has been pa【rt【icularly \badly hit. Eco】nom【ic c/ontractions of\ 7.5 percent ar】e e\xpected in 【t\h【e eur\o zone's 19 countries, and 6.5 percent /in t\he United Kingdom.】&ldqu【o;\The reason for the very, very sharp downgrade c】om\pared to other 】countries is simply that the epidemi】\c h】as taken \a much larger tol/l】 so fa】r on Europe than/ it has on】 other parts of the world,&rdquo/; Milesi-Ferretti said in a\n inter\v/i【ew with\/ E\【urone【ws'】 busine\ss editor】 Sasha Vakul】ina.&ld/qu/o;T】his is why【 it is so ess】ential for governmen/ts t】o take/ really dracon】ian】 measures to keep firms from going bankrupt, to k/ee】】p workers from losing their wages\. This\ is/ also a very l【ar\g】e investment that yo【u are makin【g /int【o preparing/ t/he ec/onomy to res】】tart," h\e /said.】World trade i\s pr】ed\icted to\ plunge 【by 11 per【cent t【his【 year b【efore growing by\ 】8.4 【p/ercent in\ 2021.【The IM【F ac\compa【nies its foreca\sts\ with a warni\ng that there are many unknown factors: inc\luding t】he pa\t/h the virus will】 ta\k\e, the effectivenes/s of \policies take】n t/o cont】ain the outbr\eak an\】d l【imi【t the economic damage, and uncertainty over the situation severa/l /months fro【m now.Share\ this article【C【opy/paste the【 article video embed【 link below/:CopyShareTweetS】hares】endShareTweetShare\】se】ndMore/HideShareSendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou might also like\ 【 \ Coron】】avir】us in E【urope: How will the EU/ €5】00bn 【rescue deal help pe【ople and bu\sinesses? / / 【 \ / Coro\navir\us va】ccine: P\【h】arma giant】s\ G/S/K/ and S/anofi team up to【 find COVID-19 solution 【 【 Sur/vivors o】f cor】onavirus on their experience/ - and【 thei/r【 new perspective 【 / / 】 More aboutCorona\vir】usIMFFin\a【\n【cial /ai/dEcono】myHot 】Top\ic/Learn more about Coronav【irus Hot \To\picLearn more about/ Coronavirus / Browse today's/ tagsODZJ

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U4lUTe【xt sizeAaAaEarl/】ier this\ ye】ar Glasto【nbur】y Fes\tival made hea/dlines b/y annou\ncing t\h\at it wi/ll implement a site-wide ban on plast【ic bottles sta】rt/ing in 2019. All over the world, musi】c festival【s of all【 size/s are becoming \increasi】n/gly c\onscious of their\ ecolog\ic】al footprint.According to P【owerful Thinking, an/ organi【zation that works with festivals t】o l\ower their envir【onment】al footprint, 】i】n the【 United Kingdom alone summer music festivals are resp【onsib】le for ap\proximately 100 kilotons \of CO2 (including audie/nce travel), 23,500 tons of w\aste an】d 5 millio】【n li【ter/s 】of diesel \con【sumpti】o\n.But it/ do】esn’t have to b】e this way\. Mo\re an/d more fe\stivals /are takin【g sustainability and environm【ental co\ns】iderat/ions ve【ry【 se】rio\usly so\/ that you【, the festiva【l-g】oe【r, ca】n party it up the gr\een wa】y. One such【 【f】e【stival is Budapest&rsq】uo;s Sziget Festiva\l, which has won 】Best Li】ne-U/p a】nd /Best Major F\es\tival at 【t\he Europea【n F】estival/ Awards 】sever\al ti\mes. We sat down wit\h】 Akos Do\minus, Sz\iget’s Sustainab】ility Manager for the past 17 ye【ars, to find out what】 】they/&r\squo;r/e doing to【 keep Sziget as green as 】possible. V【iew this post \o/n\ InstagramW\hich re-cup】 d/id/ you ch\oose to take h【ome \wi【th you? :) #sziget #szigetofficial #szigetlove\\revolution #j【ointheloverevolution #\SZIGET2018 #recups】 #/sziget2019 #ec/oA post shared b/y Szi/【get Festival (@sz\igetofficial) on Sep 】1It 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,A\ctivists【 are】 raising funds to save Danish wooden 】【boat】s0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tags,/ 2018 at 5】:35\am PDTWh【e\n did Szi【get really【 start focusing on s】ustainability? What cam【e first &n】d//ash; the demand for/ sustaina【bility fr/om the visitors or /your own s】ense/ of //responsibilit】y?"The latter and it started a v】ery lo\ng time ago. M\an/agement m\ade t\he\ decision to make gre【at】er efforts in terms of sustainability in 2002】 an【d I jo\ined in 2003 to start \working on it. Back then sustainability【 at f/estival【s was mostly co】nfined /t\o was\te manag\ement but【 over the/ years we began to develop a wi\der ran】ge of activit\ies in various spher\es【 of the f】estival."What ste/ps hav\e \you taken in the 【pa【st few yea\rs to/ become more green and what【 can we】 \/expect this y【ear?"I thi【nk that the big/\ge\st neg/ative effect of the festival is waste so ou\r prio\ri/ty is re】ducing and recycling waste, thi】s is ou\【r flagship en\vironmental project. Through the years, we focused mostly on r/ecy/cling【 but s】ince la【st yea\r m】ade huge step t\owards actu/ally re【ducing was】te. We don’t allow pla/stic bags 【【to be sold a【【t the fest/ival/ an/d\ th\e food vendors cannot give out plas\ti\c】 plat】es or /cutlery (i【\t must be made of biodegradable material). Last /yea】r we launched a /new c/ampaign to r\educe the number 】【/of /straws and\ managed to cut use by 50%."S\ziget\】 Festival's "Don'【t Suc\k!】"【 camp【aignKris】】z/ta Csányi"\We also try to pro\tect the gro/un【d and soil by c/over【ing 1】【0,000sq. meters with special covers and then recultivate it. Last /year, f/o【r example,/ we recu】ltivat/ed about 3 a】cres.【 We are also\ constantly experimenting with and】 implementing wa】ter saving】 【【te【chniques such as vacuu/m 【to【ile/t】s/ whi/ch can sa】ve 85% of 【w】ater use \(i/.e. 1.5 liters of water p\er flush instead 】of】 10 liters).""We are a\lways thinking of mo【r/e n【ew campaigns to【 save water./ Last year we employed /a/\ “gu\err\il\la” awarene】ss campaign and found that through some easy】 communicat【【ions \measures we \can enc/ourag】】e\ visitors who are c】amping to shower mor\e eff【iciently. 】/We a【lso \】had /workshops with Cli/mate-KIC alumni】 /in t/he previo】us years and al\w/ays have the\se trash【 fas\h\ion workshops where peo/ple can m】a【k】e festi【va\l accessories \【out o/f waste. T/his year, we have even more sustainability ini\tiatives in \store, whic】h\ w】e will announce on Eart/h /Day (April 22/nd)!"Trash Fas【hion wor【kshop at Sziget FestivalSziget Festival"Those who like t/\o camp at festivals ca【n】 //opt【 for resting their wary bo【dies at the EcoCamp, a special【ized camp\site on the festival g】round】s that uses solar 【】p】ower \and\ boa/st】s】 a slow /food bar that encour【ag【es peop】le/ to live a slow a/n/d sustainable life."Eco C/】】a】mping at Sziget Fest/】ival\】Sz】iget FestivalSolar pow/er at Sziget's Eco\ Cam】pin\g groundSz/iget Festival"Be】/cause /tran\sport\ is 】resp\onsible for a【 very significant part of /a fes【tival’s carbon footprin\】t, we&rs\quo;v/e undertaken a lot of different tactics to re\duce the n】egative/ effects: we offer\ bu\ses/ and boats /to the fe\stival\, provide bike facilities and actively dis】c/ourage visitors thr】ough variou】s c【ampaigns from dri】vi\ng their】 cars here.】""Another in/itiative that /we've had over the pa/st few years w/as 】encouraging pe】ople to \donate their tents to【 charity because it&r】s\quo;s actu/ally a huge issue on a European level. Tons o\f tents a/nd oth/e\r camping】 gear are left behind at festivals so this way we \t\ry to collect them and give away\ to char/ities, like t\he H】ung/ar\ia】n Charity Servi/ce of t/h\e Order of Malta."Tent donation pointSz/\ige【【t FestivalAre【 there any other festivals out ther/e that are】 】really leading the way and can be considered ro【le m】o/dels】 】in \the sphere of s\ustainable party\ing?"There】\ is a /clear/ tendency of【 introduc\i\ng green efforts at \most festivals: we&rs\qu【o;\r【e see】ing a kind of “green&r】dquo; 【】】compe\tition because /th\e y【ounger generat/ions is putt\ing huge press【ures on the festival industry to /be m【o【re sustainable. Glastonbury bann\ed plas\tic bottle/s and】 】we'd like to fo/llow 】【suit in the fut】u/re\."Workshop at Szi】get Festival's "R【\e】cycling C【e/nter"Sz【iget Festival"Many festi\vals are exp\erim\ent\ing with energy effici】ency projects but,【 unf\ortunately, 】so far there\ ha【【s been【 no 【b\reakthro/ugh because festivals 【simpl】y need A【 LOT【 /of】 energy. Last year we used s【ola【r energy t\o power our illuminated banners【 but, of 】【cou\rse\, that’s a\ miniscule percenta】ge of\ the energy a fes/tival requires. On a】 larger scale, solar is 【sim】ply not\ viabl/e at the moment because turnover is 10-20 years, whils/t a festival only lasts several day\s to\ a we】】ek, \in /th【e 】ca】se of【【 Sziget. So, as an industry, we&rsq\uo;re very fa\r /away fr/om being able to use 【s/ol】ar to fully power a f【estiva】l【’s/ needs\."What role, in your opinion, do festival organiz】ers /have in shaping a genera【l 】“gr/een consciousness” /【among their att】ende】\es?"Huge. We all agree 【on that. Festiva】ls have \】a huge impact\ on yo】u/th. When people come to/\ a fest【ival they open their minds t\o le【arning and experienci/ng new thi\ngs. So there’s a【 con//sensus th/a\】t we d【o have a hu【ge 】responsibility/ to in/crease \environmental aw/are【ness."Waste Po\int at Sziget Fest【ivalKriszta /Csány/iWhat tips/advice/ would you giv【e【 attendees to enjoy themselves in a more sustainable way at Sz/iget 2019?"Sm\o】kers &nd【as【h; don’t throw【 】cigarette butts away o\n the ground, always look for a mo\bie ashtray. Find y\o【ur m【o\st environmentally friendly way to co【me to the fe】stival 【(【boat, t【rain, bus or even cyc】le) and use our rec【yc/li\ng/ 【bins."Share this a】rticl【e More from lifeejGM

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