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时间:2020-05-27 16:21:21 作者:今日头条 浏览量:43122

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】dd31 YM5QbRV9Text s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellness2SJd

yKhWNigerian women revolutionising Fine Art 【Y5pO

gSGsThis episode of【 Inspire /Afr/ica features 】a non-government【al organisation 】in t\he Republic】 of Congo, /which has embarked on a mi\【ssi【on of su\pportin】g rural \commu【nit/ie【s an\】d 【empowering them to】 contribute to the protection of /the count】ry’s bi\odivers【\ity. We】 also tak】e a tour\ \t】hrough Nigeria【\ /w\here wom\en /are revolutioni【sing/】 the world of f/i】ne arts.Share \this articleC\opy/pa\ste the article【】 video embed\ link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendShare\TweetSharesendMoreHideS【h】areSendShareShareS\/h\areSendShare\ShareYou might 】】also l\ike 【】 【 】 】 F/ire】\ engulfs market in N【igeria's commercial capital L/agos 】 【 \ 【 At least 65 kille/d in Nigeria Boko Haram attac/k - state TV \ 【 / 】 / \// If the EU won'/;t stop the s】low murd\er of "N/ige/ria&】#039;s G/a/ndhi", perhap【s Bri/tain\ can/ ǀ View 】 / 】 \ More aboutNig【【eri\aRepubl】i】c of CongoArtEnvironmental p\rotectionWomen Browse today's tagsZwHczk3y

XZoYYou and I 】/mig【ht not【 see a goldmine/ i\n the sewag/e water【 from the city of Brussels, but a tea\m of scienti【sts are hunting for gold and silver here."Al/l the sewage of the city arr】i】ves here and /in th【e/ treatmen/t \process, the】/y 【clean up the water whi【ch i/s disposed to the river b\ack. And all t】he so\lid mater\ia【l which con\tai/ns also a/【ll the/\ metals】 is c\once/ntrated 【in t】\【he slud】ge," explain\s \Dr N\atacha Brion -】 】VUB Scie【ntist.D\r Natacha Brion is c】ollecting sa】mpl\es at a number of sewage s【ites around Brussels/.T】hey're 6 mo】nths into a】 /3 year project. Hunti/ng for tiny nano-par/ticles of gold and silver not visib】le to the naked eye - at /ea/ch stage】 wh/ile/ the sewag\e is processed.Their init【ial findings are that the dried out dark \brown dust cal\led slidge i\s the richest.Th\e material f\alls into the co\n】taine/r, th/is is th【e sludge, th/e mat\erial /that N【atacha and her team ar【e /interested in. It/\ smells\ disgusting.Back in t\he lab w【here three uni】v】ersitie\s ar\e c】ollabo】ra】ting on this pro【ject - they】're working out how to extract 】t\he preci【】ous metal/s."We w】/oul【d like to use nano-materials/ and i【ron oxide【/ nano-particle【s which are magnetic t【o be able to collect se\parately \these 【different ions in 】solutions,"】 Professor Gill】es Bruylan【ts - UL/【/B Scientist.Their initial tests find th\ere's 】aroun/d 1 gram of gold and 5 grams o/f sil/v\er per to/n of\ sludge.They bel/ieve sports\ 】clot【hing or perhaps jewellery during washing and ce】rtain/ medicines are w\here the\ nanop/ar/ticles of gold and silver are】/ coming fro/m."Their】 resour\ce \i/s almost【/ exhau【sted so yo/u【/ don't fi//nd them easily anymore in nature. And/ so now many scientists are t\rying to find al/l poss\ible 【ways o\f recyc\ling these,/" says B【rio【n.And the whole thing i\s also【 about opti/mising sewage proces】sing so treate】d wate/r enter【in【g rivers】 like【 thi\s remains uncontaminated.Shar\e this articleCopy/pa\ste the article video emb【ed link below:Cop【yShar】eTweetSharesendShar/eTwe\etSharesen\dMo【reHi/deShare/SendShareShareShareSendShareShareYou mig【ht also like / / 【 【 】Meet the researcher【s us\in\g se【a tu【rtles 】to learn more about cyclones / 】 \ \ 【 \ European p\【roject Best【Med/Grape i/s /helping winegrow\ers 【transform g/rap】e】 w\aste into cos/metic products 】 / Degraded land begi【ns to bloom thank\s to European compo】【sting project \ \ More a/bo\utResearch】 & DevelopmentResearch\Enviro】nmenta【l prote\ction 【 \Br/owse【 【tod/ay�】39【;s tagsQk8t

crw1\Is o\ne week en\ough?【 0 m【edia outle\【ts【 dedicate \】news to climate 】changec4ya

ZDPgOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tags65y5

Sea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \

Sg7rTide turns f/or an Italian coas\tal wa/steland【/raGo

aUmQCould jel/ly【fish be th/e answer t】o fighti【ng ocean pollution?eLjh

c69e“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Our s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】ags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsbXfb

BUhhDubai&r】\squ/o;s airports ha\ve banned all single\ use plastics as t【h\】e city works towards a plas/tic-free futur】e.It comes as the attitu/de/ towards si】ng\l】e use plastics /i\/s changi\ng./ In Dubai, 90 pe】r cent of peop】le say they are making a conscious effor/t\ to reduce their own plastic waste consumption】.Nearly fo【ur in five say t\hey rec/ycle more no/w than they d/id five years a\go. A\n/d one in four people say they're en】couraged to recycle more by corporations championin【g pla】】stic-free initiatives.Dubai Inte\rnational 【Airport \along with Dubai W】orl\d Ce\ntra】l welcome a/lmost 9】0 million passeng\【ers each y/\ear【. B\//ut with 【those passengers comes 5,/5【Defo\restation in 【the Brazilian Amazon \rainforest went up by 13.7% between August 2017 a【nd\// /July 2018【, accordin】g\ t【o the \coun】t【r/y’s\ Natio/n/al I/nstitute for /Space Researc\h (I\NPE).The INPE】 said that【 becau/se /of the incr/eased/ deforestation,\ Brazil had lost a\ total area of 7.900 km&/sup【】2; of rainforest, which G\reen【peace Br/azil estimates is c】lo\se t\o a million】 football pit【ch【es or five times the 【\size of 【London — Europe's larg/est city by\ area.Brazil has t】he\ largest】 sur/face of the A】mazon rain【forest in South Ame【rica.Our pic\ture gallery shows 【the scope of deforestation this pa】st year /in Brazil's Amazon for】est/....New Gallery 2018】//28 © Christian 【Bra【ga / 【Green】peac】eo【riginal/date 1/1/0001 6:00:0/0 AMwidth \】1200he\igh】t 801 &cop【y/】; Christian Braga \/ Greenpeaceoriginaldate 1/1/00/01 6:00:00 AMwidth】 2】5】/00height/ 16REU\TERS/UESLEI MARCELINOor/iginaldate \/1/1/0【001 6:00:00 AMwidth 6720heigh/t 4480 © C/hristian Braga /\【【 Gre】e】np【eacecameramake NIKON C【ORPORATIONfocal/length 24h【ei/ght 800fnumber 6.3exposu/retime】 0.】00062【5alt: 2/60lat【: 【/-10.754733【l/ong: -68.743800】c【/amerasoftwa【re Adob【e\ Photosho】】p Lighoriginaldate 10//3/2018】 3:50:36 PM\width 1200c\ameramod/】el /NIKON /D850 © C/hristian Braga / Greenpeac【ecameramake NIKON CO/R【PORA】T/IONfocal】leng】】th 31height 800fnumber 【10e\xposuretime 【0.000】al【t: 240la/t: -9.8】9893/3long: -68.710900camerasoftwar】e Adobe】/ Photoshop Lighor\iginaldate 10/3】//20 5:32:40 PMwidt\h 1200cameramo【del NIKON D850 © Christian Braga / Greenp/ea【cecam】eramake 】NI\K\ON CORPORATIONfocallength 95he【ight 800fnumber 4.5\exp\osuretime 0.000】625cameraso【ftware Adobe Pho】toshop L【ighorigi/naldat/e 10】/2/2018【 9:43: PMwidth /1200\cameramodel N\IKON【 D850According to Gr【eenpeace Brazil, the /cause for 】the i【\ncreased defore/station lies in】 【Brasilia with the government.The NGO blam\es the rural lob\by i【n【 C【ongress for\【 &ldqu】o;threat\ening the rainforest, its peop】le,\ and the planet’s climate&【rdquo;.The l【obb】y’】s agenda incl【udes promo/tin【g farm/ers’ rights, expa【nd\ing】 arable lan\d in the country, and opposes the e【xpa【nsion of indigenous lands, according to 【\【Brazilian me【dia.“This set o】f pr】opo【s】als benefit those who want t【o destroy】 the rainfor【est, g\rind l】an【d】\, and steal the natur/al】 heri【\ta【ge of the Brazilian peop【le. The consequences are translated into 】the a】moun【】t of\ destruction/ in the Amazo】n,” said M\arcio Astrini, coor/di/【nator of public policy for Gre/e/npeace 】Br/azil.Brazil's 【environment minister/ Edson Duarte said i/n 【a statement】 that illegal logging was the main fact\o【r for 】the increas【ed de\forestation. While Brazil's Cl/i\ma/te Ob】servatory, a net】【work of NGOs, said in another statement that ap】art fro\m/ illegal loggin\g it was the growi】ng】 commodities s】ector that was\ c【on/tributin\g to fo【re【st destruc】tion. The green NGO also w/arns th】at the environmental politi/c】s of Braz】il's ne】w presiden【t【, Jair B【olsona\ro, co\uld furth\er devastate the 】rainforest."He's\ said \that\ he would put an end to protecte【d areas【, to lands reserve】d to indigenous communities, that h】e would reduce inspections /and sanctions aga/】in/st e】nvironmental cri】mes. Every】thing that reduc【ed def【orestation 【before. If he 【elimin\ate】s】 all of this,/】 it would trigger a【n unimaginable si/tuation," said Astrini】.Euronews has reached out to【 G】ree【npeace Brazil for comment\ on th/e current defore/station of Br\az\il's Amazon ra】in】forest.Share this articleShareTweetSha/resendShareTweetSharesendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShareSha/re\Send【Sha【reShareYou might a\lso \like \】】 Watch:】 Footage of uncontacted Amazon t】ri/be m】emb/ers e/merges/ as /deforesta【tion expands \ \ \ \ 】 【 Amazon wildfires: Wh【y is\ the South /Americ/an rainforest 【so important? 】 】 \ 】 / Amazon fires 】generate smoke clo】ud almost a/s \bi\g as devastating\ Siberia blaze \ 【\】 //M\ore a/boutEnvironment\Envir】onm】ental protectionBrazilAm\azonia 【 Browse today【'\;\s tags tonnes of pla/stic.The airports】&r/squo; operator, /Dubai Airports, banned all single use plastics from 【inside the terminal a】t 【t\he beginning of】 this year/.Th】at【 means that plastic cutle【ry, water bottle【s, dri【nking straw】s/, packaging and polythene bags are all banned from cafes and【 rest\aurants.Eugene Barry, D】ubai A\irp\orts’ executi【ve vi/c【e /president (commercia】l), told F/ocus: 】&ldqu】o;\Ni/nety f【i】ve per \cen【t of our partners have actua】lly made the pledge to switch from plastic to appropriate and re】levant substi\tutes for 【som/e of the pr/oducts that are used in catering and/ 】r【etail a【\cross the airport.”【The /operator hope】s it】's a strategy that m/ight become a\ t】em【plate for o\/t/her major transpo\rtation h】ubs and bus【inesses】.“Thi【s is ver】y much 】/the early stages of a long/ journey, I 【believe, t【o h\/ave a more e【nvi【ronmentally frie/ndly ap【proach /to managing bu【/【\sines】ses,&\rdquo; Barry said.\To see the a/mount of plastic that's building up in our s【and an【d in our oceans is jus\t cr】azy. Tom Arnel, Common\ Gro】unds founder】【 】 / \ Dubai&】rs/q】uo;s 700 h【otels are already【 look\in【g \【【at alternati【v\es, s/uch as switching\ water bottles from plastic to glass/.Plastic key cards could a/lso be a thing of /the /pa】st, as develop】ers /【l【ook i/nto switc\hing them to wood-b/ased materials.The eco packagin\g company Avani is one firm offering plast\ic-f/ree】 a/lte/rn】atives, including a bag 】made from cassa\va, 】a ch】eap and common 】root【 vegetable.The ma【terial is bio/【deg/radable a【nd compostable/, breaking down over a perio【d of month/s on land【 or】 at【 sea.Peter Avram, 【\man【】agin【】g director of Avani Middle East, sai/d: &/l】dqu/o;Until /a 【couple【 of years ago we had no 【major solutions, pa/rt/icularly for 】the bag.&】rdquo;Bu【t the cassava b】ag, a 】mixtu】r\e of starch, vegeta\bl/e oil /and organix r/\e】sins, has changed the equation.Avram】 said the 【product has helped re/duce t/he 】use of plastic bag\【s by mor\e than 50 per\ c\en】t.To【m Arnel, founder of the Comm【on /Grounds coffee c】hain, is on【e 【company ma】king 】the sw【itch【.“As a father of three kids, I take【 my family to t【he beach all the /ti/me 【and t/o see the 】amount of/】 \plasti\c th【at's building u/p in o】ur sand and in our ocea】ns i/s just crazy.&rdq】uo;His\ company has 】ph】\a】/sed out pl\a/stic c【ups and bowls.“We serve 【th【ousands【】 of 【cust/omers a week and every little bit【】 that we /can do really 【does go 【a long way 】to help the situ/at【ion. 】It's just\ 】about mak【ing sure that you do the work to\ understand where the single u\se pl/a/【stic is. All \of our plastic cups【, all/ of our takeaway 】bowls and p】lates and cutlery, you know, 】replenishing those 【a】reas of o\ur kit【chens with t】hings that we kne\w【 work great fo/r the environment.&rd【quo;Arnel s\aid the feedback 【f\ro/m customers had b【ee【n “amazin【g”.&ld】quo】;As l【ong as 】everyon\e's d】oi【n/g t】heir bit an【d understanding their/ impact, /we should 】be】 able to make a 】change togethe【r\.”Share 【t【his a】rticl/eCop/y/paste th\/e article video e/mbed link b/elo【w:C/opyShareTwee【tSharesendShar【eTweetSharesen【dMoreHideShareSend/ShareShareShareSendShar/eShareYou/ might als/o like 】 The appetite for l\ocal sustain】abl】e food【 p【ro/duce in the U/nited Arab 【Em/irates 【 【 \ \ 【 \ New era【 for B【enidorm as r\esort embraces sustainabili/ty 【 \ \ Health innovations - the 】young Europe【ans /dreaming up c//re\ative solutions for healthca】r\e 】 More 【aboutR【e】cycl】i】ngEnvironmental 【protectio】/nDub【ai /United Arab E/mirat\es】 Most viewe/d / 】 【 【 【 / 【 Beijing is their campus: Insid【e the Chines【e capital’s life-ch/anging stud/y tours \ \ / 9 places to visi】t on your【 cul/t】ural trip around】 Croatia // \ 【 \ \The Palm J\um\eirah: Du/bai�【39;s symbol of cre【ativity and ambiti/on 】 \/Market】s, coffee and stre】et【 /art: discove/ring Zagreb's secret delights 【】 】 【 】 \ \ \ Greek islands of his【tory and culture 【 】 \ \ \/ Br\owse today�】39;s 】t【ags06Ds

ClATMilk-】made fashion from】【 Tu】sca【nymqhm

ludqBy 2050 around 80% \o/f th/e w/orld's po/pula\t】ion w\ill 【be【 living i\n urban areas.【Currentl\y, they occ\upy【 3% of the Earth's】 surface but produce around 72% of gr/eenhouse gases.Gro\wing urba【nization along with climate change will have a 【seriou\s impact on 】o/ur life in /【citie】s in\ ter/ms o\f air quality, warmer tem】peratures and high\er 】【floo】【d 【risk.But /so【lutions 【to reducing the environment\al impact and i【mpro/ving people's quali【ty of life\ ha/【s been found i/n nature/.Scientists【 working at the European project UR\BAN Gre\en-Up【 in Va/【【【l\ladoli】d, /Spa】i//n are te/sting Nature-\Based Sol【utions (NBS) that could a【llow sustain】able urban development.【Involvin\g 25 partner\s from 9 countrie\s /and 8 cities, the p】rojec/t found that the】 key is in th/【e natural properties which ca】n be employed to】 mitigate climate change effects.URBAN 【Gr【een-Up proj【ect coordinator, R\a&uac\ute;l Sánche】z Fr/ancés, explains】 【that some plants can wo/rk as a therm【o-re/\gul】a/to】r and reduce the temperature of 【s【urround/ing【s./"For th】at, we have solutions like green roofs, mobile v\ertical garde】n \or green\ f/aca/des."An im】【por【ta【n】t part of/ t/he project is dedicated to 【th】】e tr【e/atment of air\ an\d】 rainwater in cities.S】pecific type/s of plants, thro/ugh】 their leaves and roots, can work \as natura\l filters."/That solution is an urba【n biofilter," sa/\ys Franc&eac】ute;s】/\. "We used /to call /it green \【chi\mney. We want【 t\o install it on the roof close to the chimneys to clean up th/e】 【【output of\ combustion.""This system is able 【to mainly catch n】itrogen oxides an【d 【\【part/icu【late matter, the two m\ain pollutants 】issued by vehicles and heating systems.The po【tential of nature-based sy【\stems is significant.For example】, in Valladolid a cycle \lane and a】 g【ree】n pavem/ent could pre\v\ent the emiss\ion\ of n/early 200 tonnes CO₂//; and reduce \te/mperatures by 5°C du/ring summer.But the cit\y&\r【squo;s configurat\ion 【/is】 a 【fa/ct【or to】 deal with/."We h】\ave to solve some iss【ues, the main one is t】he lack 】\of sp】ace. Then, w】e \also have problems 【【with o】ccupy】【ing public spaces, b/ecause we 】have unde】【rground w【ater【 pipes, e】lect/ri\c n【etwo【rk, underground p\arking," says Alicia Villazán Cabe【r【】o, a s】enior e【nvi/ronmental consultant at Valladoli【d city 】council【.Valladolid, /Spain, Izmir, Turkey and】 Liverpool, UK are the /three front r/unners 】citie】s wh【】】ich are t/e/sting more than \forty na【\ture】-based methods.Liverpoo】l【 is a city with huge traffic density: 1.35/ b】illion /vehicle】 miles were travelled on】 its roads in 2018 acc\ording t\o officia【l statistic//s.B【ut solutions like arboreal interventions, for instance, are ex】pected to r【educe carbon】 emission【s by 5.55 tons p】er ye】ar and te】mpe/rature】s by 2-4°C during 】the summer seas】on."We have issues \wit【h air q/uali\/ty in Liverpool. We【 /h【av【e a few hotsp】ots 】\around the ci【ty so \【these\ trees will hel/p us clean up 【there,"【 says Fernando N\u/&/nt】ilde;ez Veiga, the/ divisi\onal /ma】nager for majo//r\ hi】ghwa】ys/ projects at Liver】/p】o/ol city /council."The trees are just pha】se one. We ha/ve planted 1 trees//, the p【lan is to plan【】t more than 150 trees.【 That wil/l h【elp \to clean /up this area."The b\【irthplace of Be】atles is implementing several tail\ored strategi【es, /such as green routes, bio pollutant filters, 【pollinator gardens, and sust/aina】ble dra【inage\ systems to reduce the impact of flood risks.【"What we a】r】e looking to】 do is to put thes/e 】green】 interventions into the right place in the c】it【y; \we wi【ll be】 monit【ori\ng air qu【alit【y, water quality, biodivers【ity, looking \at wellbe/】ing/, people’s percep】tion of/ the \area, and /loo\king a】t some economi/c indic【ators as well," sa\ys Juliet Stapl】es, a s\enior pr【ojec【\t manager for URBAN \【Greenup 】at Liverpo\ol c【ity coun/cil.Once the whole set of nature-/based【 s【oluti【ons】 is 【v【alidated, it will be transf/erred to a\nother five cities; Mantov】a, Italy【; L【udw】igsburg, Ger/man【y\; Medellin, Colombi/a; Cheng/du, China; Binh Dinh, Vietnam and \replicated all over the world, to green up our more/ and more overcrowded urb【an areas.1212121212121212J/ourn\alist name/ • \Katy Dartf\ordShare this articleCopy/paste the artic/le video embe\d li】nk below:CopyShareTweetS\haresendSh/areTweetSharesend/MoreHideShareSen/dSh】areShareShareS【en\dShareShare】You might a】lso like 【 / Smart farming: how tec【\hno\logy is i】mproving animal welfare and efficiency in agriculture 【 \ \ / / 】\ 】 / Can d】rones help/ greek olive oil producers【】/? / / \ Captu】rin【g CO2: How to\ reduce ca/rbon d/ioxide/ 】emi】ssions 】from the ceme】nt indu】//stry / 】 】 More aboutEnvironmen\tal prote】c【tionEcologyScience【 \ Most vi】ewed \ / /【 】 Wha】t influence o\n climate/ i【/s /th\e cor【onavirus lo\ckdown rea\lly hav\i【ng? 【 【 】Th【e\ new AI system safeguarding pre\ma\/ture babies from/ 【infection\ 】 \ / Messenger RNA/: t\he molec/ul\e【 that may teach【 our b【od\ie\【s to beat cance/r / / Apple and Googl【e \say they'll work together t】o 【trace spread】 of coronavirus via sma】rtphones 】 How EU funding is chang】ing the fac】e of Lat/vian innovat/ion 【 【 】 Browse today�/39;s tagsfnxi

KXmLT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifeUrM6

mUDDHow smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunities0rWc

27WFEthiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one dayNdRZ

yUp3Our s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agshDBR

BOD6Capturing CO2: How to r\educe carbon dioxide emissions from the ceme【nt in】dustr/ygzct

tGWKText sizeAaAaT/he Osc\ar-winning actor and\ fi【lm produ】c/e/r is no longer just the Wol/f\ of 【Wall 【Street, or our beloved Jack from Ti/tanic, he&\【rsqu/o;s now a ful\ly-fle【【dged env\i】ronm\e】ntalist on a mission.L【eading 【the c\harge on World E\arth\ Day every year, Di【Ca/prio this year released a '/We Lo\ve 【The Earth'/ music vid【eo aiming to【 make people【 think twice about the/ w】ay 】they treat the planet. He 】a【l/so made a 【do【c】um/enta\ry【 in 2016 with Nationa/l Geographic, 'Before The Flood【', where he m【et s【cientist/s, activists and \world le【ade】rs to d【i\scuss the dange【rs of climate change.Read more | How Justin Bieber 】shut down an Ic/eland\ic /beauty sp】otBack in\ 2015, DiCaprio decided to take the plung\e and purc/】hase an island in Belize \to bui\l【d his very own eco-resort, s\et to 】be \&l】dquo;\g\rou/nd-breaking in/】 the environmental movement.&rdquo】; 【The island in /qu\estion, Blackado/re Cay【e, was sold fo\r ./75 m\il/li/on to DiCaprio and his bu\siness】 partn\【er, who h\ave/ been working ever since to\ create an eco-haven in Central America, which is //s\et /t\o open in 2020.\Where exactly is it and why has/n’t it opene\d yet?\【B】lackad\/ore Caye island is sit【uated off the coa\st of Belize\, with a diverse ecosy\s】tem/ of land and /marine【 species/【 that is recognise】d g/\lo/【bally as part【 of the ‘Mesoamerican B/iological Corrido\【r&rs/qu/o;\ region. Nea\rly 1.5 million tourist 【visit Belize each y/ear, to stay in【 beachfront cottages an\d luxur】y hotel【\s alike. But Le】/onardo DiCaprio’\s e\co-reso【rt could】 mark a】 【revolutionary change to tourism i/n t/he area, as visitors would【 come \f【o/【r a &l】dquo】\;rest【orative experie】nce” o\n th/eir s】ust\ainable stay.BelizeGetty ImagesAlexander \HafemannThe eco-resort was supposed 【to o\pen in 2018, but the team anno/【unced that the opening was to be delayed u/ntil【\ late 2019 as it was still incomplete. This /year, it is pr\esumed that th\e/ new opening is to be in 2020】, as the pro/ject has been o/n 】hold while envi\r【o】/nmental /【studies and permi】ts have been】 /issued b\y th】e governm【e】nt of Belize.What would the eco-resort b\e like?The isl】and【 \has suffere\d from overf【ish\in\g, an er\o【din/g coastline and deforestation \of its m\angrove tree/】s for/ years. DiCaprio’s resor\【t is hoping to be the eco-\f/riendl/y /answer to 】the/ 104-acre island’【s environmental problems throug\h building ‘off-t【he-grid liv\ing h】omes’ /and a research\ station focused on climate chang/【e. It plans/ to be the &\l】squo;World’s】 fi\rst/ truly/ restorative is【la\nd/ develo】pment’.Related | An eco-f【riendly twist on【 Alexa C】hung's Glaston【bury styleWhen it 【finally opens, the e/xclusive eco-resort will /jo【in Belize【's Four S】e\asons H【otel, wh/ich is also/ due/ to open in th\e near future as a green destinat\i】on.M\ock /up of Four \Seaso\ns Hotel, Be/lizeCourtesy】// of Four Sea\sonsDiCaprio's e】co-resort will feature a h【otel, 】36 resort bungalow】s and 36 e】stat】】e villas, with details 【s】uch as ‘circadian/ l【ighting’ and solar panels 】so t】hat 】each ho】me i】s energy e】ff【icient. Outdoor a\nd indoor ex\periences will be m【erged with open-air buildings/ /surrounded by 】palm t【rees, lush, green landscap\es an】d infi\n【//ity po/ols.\Footbridge ove】r river i\n【 tranq/uil fore/st in BelizeGetty ImagesTim He】sterWith un/rivalled sunset views, Blackadore Caye is 【being described a】s t/he Maldi\】ves of Central A【merica.W】hat d\oes Leonardo 【DiCapri】o have to say?Di\Caprio is an avid scu】ba diver. In fact, it was【/】 his/ f【irst trip /to Beli【z\e 【\to swim【 in】 its barrier reef i】n 2005【】 \that sparked the ac\tor&\r/squo;s love\ of th\e islan\d.In an interview【 wi】th The New Y】ork Ti【mes, Leonardo DiCapr/io said/ about the eco-resort:“The \m\ain focus is to do\ \something that wi\ll cha/nge the world. I couldn&rs【quo;t have gone】 to Belize and built on an \isl】and an【/d don】e something 】like t】his, i\f it weren’t for the【【 ide/a \that it \could be groun\/】【d】-break\ing i\n the environ\me【ntal movement.”Leonardo DiCaprioReuters&【ldquo;Wi\th】 th/【e onset o【\f clima【te chan/ge, ther【e are huge challenges, \so we want the structure to \not o\nly en\hanc/e and improve the environment, but to be a m/odel fo【【r the/ future./”Sha\re this\ arti】cle \ More from placesXSM0

zIfnScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsMWnk

R3EYTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placeshqQI

1.e3olThe world's highest/-op\erating\ weather st\ations have been installed on M\ount\ Everest, a【ccording to th】e Nation【al Geogr\aphi【c Society. The】y \were placed 】at 8,4/30\ metres and 7,945 metre【s as part \of a three-mon/th scien/tific】/ 【assessme\nt of\ the planet's t/allest peak.The expedition t】eam set o【ut to Everest to gain a deeper understanding of/ t】he/ 【effects of cli】mate change on t【he Kara【koram\ glacie\r/ r】【ange. Due to【 increasing global temp【eratu【res, t\hese glaciers have b【een rapidly disap】pearing, sa\y the scientists.【The/ geol】ogy team from Nat【ional Ge【【ographic【 and Rolex's【 Perp\etual Planet Extreme Expediti/onNATIONALGEOGRAPHIC/FREDDIEWILKINSONNATI/ONA/LGEOGRAP】HIC/FREDDI【EWILK\INSONTh【e extreme weath\er conditions ra】vaging this 【region\ has m\ad【e studying th【e effects o/f】 climate cha\】nge \on】 the are【a accurately nearly impossible. Th\e rese】arch completed on the expedi/tion "will fill critical data g】aps on the【 world&【rsquo;s life/ support sy】stems and drive solutions\ to /assur】e tha】t they c\a】n c/ont\】inue to fuel our future,&rd【quo; says executive director /Jonath\on Baille./A】 night wi【nd spins an anemometer\ at a 【weat/h\er stati/on installe】d during Nati【onal/\/ Geog/rap】h】ic 【a\nd Rolex's 2019 Perpetual P】l\【anet Extreme Exp\edition to Mt. Ev\erest/NATIONAL】GEOGRAPHIC/ERICDAFTNATION【AL/【GEOGRA\PHI/C【/E【RICD\AFTTo und【ertake /the stu\dy, cl//imate scientists researched bi】olo【gy, geology,【 glacio\l【ogy, map【ping,】 and\ meteorology in /the Karakora】m range. The】se fields of science, they \believe, are the most critical in understanding the e\ffects of cl【imate c/hange on t【he env】iron【ment.A total】 of five weather stations were installed on Everest/ and l/ive updates from the station are available at the Nati\onal Geo/graph【ic webs【】ite.Share this articleShareTweetSharese【ndShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShare\S/hareSendShareShareYou mig【h/t 【als/o lik\e 】 Watch/: River of clouds descends on Alpine valley【 】 \ 】 \ 【 / \ New coronavirus /not the 】\real killer: 【\it\&#】】039;s the pat\ient s 】im】\mune system\ damaging vital organs 【 】 】 】 /\ /France w/arn/s of serious side ef\】fects of c\oronavirus ‘miracle cu/res’ / 【 \ / 【 / M/o】re aboutClima/teScience/Environmental protectionWea】therHot TopicL/earn more about Clima\te Hot TopicL/earn more ab\out 【Climate 【 】 Brow/se tod\ay&【#039;s tagsTq4m

2.W0XUGlobal energy\ demand\ debated at A】/\bu Dha/bi Sustain】abilit\y WeeksJuI

3.20VpText si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifewj0o

4.CenJThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsud1z

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zzrXThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsfSxb

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sMuUA】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 2050o3iL

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B6pn\President Donald Trump】 says he has issued a directive to halt U【S pay\ments 【to t\he\ World Health \【O【rganizatio\/n.T】/he funding wi【ll】\ 【cease pending a review of WH/O's \warnings abo\ut/ the coronavirus\ and C/h/i】na.Trump sa/y【s 】the outb】reak could h\av/\e been contained at its sou【r【ce and spared lives had the U\N health a】gency done a better 【job inv/estigatin【g reports comin\g out【 of China.Trump cl【aims th/e organisation failed \to carry】 out its ///&ldquo\/;bas【ic dut/y&r【dquo; and】 must 【be held accountable.Shrinki【n】g of UK economyEarlier o【n【 Tuesday th/e UK's /tax and spending watchdog/ has s/aid the British econ【o\my \cou【ld shrink\ by 】a record 35 percent】 by June. The bl】eak report come【s fro【m the\ Office for Budget Respo】nsibil/ity.Com/menting【 on the g【\overnment's resp\onse /to the crisis, Finance Minister Rishi Sunak sa\id the measures p】u【t/ i\n p\lace w/ere the \"right p/lan".View his news conference in the video p/l/【ayer aboveOffi】ci【al statistics on Tuesday showed t\/hat hun【dred】s of deaths in British car【e homes have not been in】cluded i【n】 govern【【ment f】igures -- which only /take\ account of death/s in hospita\ls. I】【t【 has led to crit/ic/ism that the eld/erly ar\【e being "airb\rushe】d \/ou】t".Sunak insist【ed that the country's【 battle against coronavi/rus was "n\ot a\ choice between health 【and economics". Other 【key \developments:The/ Internationa/l Mone】tary Fund (IMF) sai】d in its】 latest forecast t/hat the w【orld econo\my would suffer its worst year since the Grea\t Depression of the 1930s \-- and shrink by thre/e percent in/ 20/20.US Presiden】t Donald 【Trump has defende/d his administra/tion's handling 【of the【 pan【demic】, saying he has "to】ta【l power" t\o li】ft the lockdown\ if need be.France\ /and India hav\e jo/ined Italy in/ extending their nationwide lockdowns to stem the spread of the deadly 【nove\l coronav【irus】.These decisi【ons come as the/ number of infec\tions【 worldwide near the two mi/llion threshold. Nearly 120,000 people have【 now lost 【/th\eir lives 】to COVI/D-1/9】.】Foll\o】w all the latest updatesShare thi/s articleCopy/paste the a\rticle【 vid】eo embed \lin/k below:Copy】ShareTweetS】h【aresendShareTweetS/ha【res【endMo/reHi\de\ShareSendShareShareShareSe【ndShar/eSh\a/reYou might also like / / / Rising populism sto【kes disco\ntent but offers f\ew solutions to】 global thre【ats like COV\ID-1【9 ǀ View 】 【 【 / \ C/ould a ce】ntury-old met/hod 】help treat COVID-】【1 pa】tients? 【 】 \ \ \ \ 】 / How to s】tay healthy\ working from h】【ome, according to chiropractor\s\ 】 【 More aboutC】O】VID【-1CoronavirusEuro【pean Un\ionHot Topi】cLea/rn more about / Coronavir\u\s Hot TopicLearn more about 【 Coronavirus \ Brow/se【 tod】ay】9;s tagsp7kg

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eSDKNow the【】 blame /game \over Brexit appear【s to be in f\ull swing, in Brus/se【ls, they'r】e \starti【ng to kis\s goodby\e to the idea of /an orderly exit by th/e UK on October t/he 31】st."T\o 【put things v】ery fra【nkly \and t\o t\ry and be object】ive, on this parti\cular 【point, we are not r【eally i】n a position where we are/ able /to\ find an agreement."Ea】rlier in the day the EU Commi】ssion spokesperson 】tweeted that emotions are running high, but that the EU】 wants a 】deal.Also i/n town】, suppo】r/ter of a unified Ireland, Sinn F&eacut\e;in's Mi\chelle O'Neill from Northern I【reland. C/oncerne【d about the UK【's sugges【tion of cu【stom】s chec/k】s】 to re】place to c】ontroversial Ir/ish backsto【p."We’re here to make the case f【or /why I/reland nee/ds to be protected. /We【&rs\quo;re /h/ere /to ma】ke the case for o【【ur peace process/. Tha\nkfully, the】 Eu/ropean \Union has been co【nsistent t/hroughou/t the Brexit debate in standing up for the Goo【d】 Fr】/iday 】agreement, and we expect them to hold to th】at toward the end of this【 negotiation. Clear】ly we look li【ke we&rsquo【;re mo【ving toward a clif】f /edge\ Br】exit."T】he UK's Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay will 】spen【d Thu/rsday in 】B/russ\el】s with his【 /EU counterpart /Michel Ba【rn【ier.Talks r\es【umi\ng \amid fadi/ng hopes 【\for comp】romise【s 】on either sid\e."On the whole, the escalting communicat\ion\ \hasn'【t\ been very helpful and i thi】nk it\ has /damaged goodwi【ll and【 the lit】tle\ bit of trust that was l【eft," says Larissa Burner - European Policy Centre.Pressure【 on /Boris John】son the【n】 in/ the\ run u\p next week's summit of】 EU lead】ers.It'll be h\i/s first 】visit【\ to/ Brussels as prim/e ministe】r and the 27 other E】U leaders will col【lectiv\ely \gri/l\l him on what's【 he had【【 to say.Share this ar【ticleCopy/paste 】the article \video embed\ lin】k【 below:Co/pyShare/Tw】eetSh【ares\endSha/reTweetShare\sen】dMoreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen/dShare【ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 T\he week in Euro\pe: 【how is the bloc faring in t/he coronavirus fight? /】 /】 】】 【 / Green mayor calls /】for Pari\s to ban outdoor heaters amid \CO】2 concerns 【 \ / 【\】 / The \B/rief: fund】i】ng Europe�】39;/s green ambit【ions / More/ abo】utCl】imateE\nvironmental pro】tectio/n】Fossil fuelsHot 】Topi\cLearn more about Climate Ho】t Topic\Learn mo/re abou\t Climate \ 【 【/ Browse toda】y&#/039;s t【agsHmFZ

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